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Information for foreign-trained cardiology technologists

English: ROCAFUERTE, Ecuador (May 16, 2011) Lt...

English: ROCAFUERTE, Ecuador (May 16, 2011) Lt. Cmdr. Brad Serwer, a cardiologist from Olney, Md., listens to a patient’s lungs at the Escuela Don Bosco medical site during Continuing Promise 2011. Continuing Promise is a five-month humanitarian assistance mission to the Caribbean, Central and South America. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Kasey Close/Released) (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

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Information on requirements to practise

The occupation of cardiology technologist is not regulated in Canada except in New Brunswick, where technologists are required to be registered with the New Brunswick Society of Cardiology Technologists. To practise in Canada, it is preferable for cardiology technologists to be registered with the Canadian Society of Cardiology Technologists (CSCT).

Affiliated with the Canadian Cardiovascular Society (CCS), the CSCT is the self-governing body that sets the standards for the profession and administers the examination and certification process for membership in the society. You may consult their CSCT Hand Guide about examination policies and procedures.

Information on assessment of qualifications

Foreign-trained cardiology technologists may contact the CSCT for an evaluation of their qualifications prior to arrival in Canada.

 

You should note that if you are already licensed to practise your occupation in a province or territory of Canada, and later wish to work in a non-regulated occupation, employers may request that you provide them with a formal assessment of your academic credentials.

If that is the case, or if you wish to have your credentials assessed for a purpose other than practising a regulated occupation in Canada, you may consult our Fact Sheet No. 2, “Assessment and recognition of credentials for the purpose of employment in Canada” and contact an academic credential evaluation service. Although evaluation services offer expert advice on how qualifications obtained abroad compare with academic credentials obtained in Canada, their evaluations are advisory only and do not guarantee recognition of your qualifications for employment or certification purposes in Canada. Please note that evaluation services charge a fee for their assessments.

 

 

Information on assessment for immigration purposes, under the Federal Skilled Worker Program (FSWP)

The Federal Skilled Worker Program (FSWP) is an immigration program administered by Citizenship and Immigration Canada (CIC), the department responsible for immigration to Canada.

CIC has listed this profession (NOC 3217) as an eligible occupation under the FSWP. To apply for immigration to Canada under this program, one of the requirements* is to obtain an “Educational Credential Assessment” (ECA) for immigration purposes from a CIC-designated organization. We invite you to communicate directly with one of the designated organizations to begin this process from outside Canada.

*It is important to note that this requirement is for immigration purposes only. It is separate from the process to obtain a license to practice from the relevant regulatory body listed below. Obtaining a license to practice is not required to apply for immigration.

Other relevant information

For a general description of duties and employment requirements, you can refer to the information prepared by Human Resources and Skills Development Canada regarding:

Specific Provincial/Territorial Information

 

You may also be interested in the CICIC information pages for:

 

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Information for foreign-trained line cooks

Chef Parking

Chef Parking (Photo credits: http://www.myparkingsign.com)

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Information on requirements to practise

This trade has been designated as an Interprovincial Standards Red Seal Trade, which means that all provinces and territories have jointly agreed on certification standards. The Interprovincial Standards “Red Seal” Examinations are administered through the provincial and territorial apprenticeship and training or certification offices. Holders of a Red Seal Certificate are exempt from further examination when moving between participating provinces and territories. A Red Seal Certificate may be required by some employers as a condition for employment. To obtain more information about the Red Seal Certificate, contact:

 

Canadian Council of Directors of Apprenticeship (CCDA)
Red Seal Program / Programme du Sceau rouge
Gatineau QC   K1A 0J9   Canada
Email : redseal-sceaurouge@hrsdc-rhdsc.gc.ca
http://red-seal.ca/c.4nt.1cts@-eng.jsp 

 

For a general description of duties and employment requirements for this occupation, you can refer to the information page on line cooks prepared by the Canadian Tourism Human Resource Council (CTHRC), a not-for-profit, government-funded sector council.

 

Canadian Tourism Human Resource Council (CTHRC)
151 Slater, Suite/Bureau 608
Ottawa ON   K1P 5H3   Canada
Phone : +1-613-231-6949
Email : info@cthrc.ca
http://www.cthrc.ca/ 

 

You may want to take the Discover Tourism Quiz to see if you are suited for this occupation. Employers set the educational requirements as well as the levels of training and experience they expect of applicants.emerit Professional Certification is an asset for line cooks.

The emerit Professional Certification

One of the most widely recognized certificates for this occupation in Canada is the emerit Professional Certification. No formal training is required to achieve this certification, and the knowledge exam, which is the first step in the process, can be taken on-line from anywhere in the world. The emerit certification system is designed to recognize individuals who have mastered the required skills and have met the standards of their profession in a practical job setting. This certificate is based on industry-defined standards and has been developed by the Canadian Tourism Human Resource Council (CTHRC).

For more information about emerit Professional Certification for this occupation, consult theinformation page on the emerit web site, or contact an emerit representative:

 

emerit Tourism Training
     
Phone : +1-613-231-6949
Phone (alternate): 1-800-486-9158
Fax : +1-613-231-6853
Email : info@emerit.ca
http://www.emerit.ca/ 

 

 

Once you know where you will settle and work in Canada, you may want to contact the appropriate local Tourism Human Resource Organization (see list below) for further assistance.

Information on assessment of qualifications

The provincial and territorial apprenticeship and training or certification offices are not set up to assess foreign qualifications prior to your arrival in Canada.

We invite you to consult our Fact Sheet No. 2, “Assessment and recognition of credentials for the purpose of employment in Canada.” We draw to your attention question 8: What is a trade and what is a Red Seal Trade?

 

Other relevant information

For a list of related job titles also used for this occupation, and a general description of duties and employment requirements, you can refer to the information prepared by Human Resources and Skills Development Canada regarding:

You may as well be interested by the information for foreign-trained executive chefs.

For additional information on the tourism industry in Canada, whether you are an employer or you are considering a career in that sector, you may want to explore the following link(s):

Specific Provincial/Territorial Information

 


flechevertehaut.gif List of provincial/territorial Tourism Human Resource Organizations

 

Alberta

Alberta Hotel & Lodging Association (AHLA)
2707 Ellwood Dr SW
Edmonton AB   T6X 0P7   Canada
Phone : 780-436-6112
Phone (alternate): 1-888-436-6112
Fax : 780-436-5404
Email : info@ahla.ca
http://www.ahla.ca 

British Columbia

go2 – The resource for people in Tourism
Suite 450, One Bentall Centre,
505 Burrard Street, P.O. Box 59
Vancouver BC   V7X 1M3   Canada
Phone : 604-633-9787
Phone (alternate): 604-633-9798
Fax : 604-633-9796
Email : info@go2hr.ca
http://www.go2hr.ca 

Manitoba

Manitoba Tourism Education Council (MTEC)
75 Scurfield Boulevard, Unit 3
Winnipeg MB   R3Y 1P6   Canada
Phone : 204-957-7437
Phone (alternate): 1-800-820-6832
Fax : 204-956-1700
Email : info@mtec.mb.ca
http://www.mtec.mb.ca 

New Brunswick

Tourism Industry Association of New Brunswick (TIANB)
500 Beaverbrook Court
4th Floor, Suite 440/4e étage, bureau 440
Fredericton NB   E3B 5X4   Canada
Phone : 506-458-5646
Phone (alternate): 1-800-668-5313
Fax : 506-459-3634
Email : info@tianb.com
http://www.tianb.com/ 

Newfoundland and Labrador

Hospitality Newfoundland and Labrador (HNL)
71 Goldstone Street (Suite 102)
St. John’s NL   A1B 5C3   Canada
Phone : 709-722-2000
Phone (alternate): 1-800-563-0700
Fax : 709-722-8104
Email : hospitality@hnl.ca
http://www.hnl.ca 

Northwest Territories

Yukon Tourism Education Council (YTEC)
Suite C – 202 Strickland Street
Whitehorse YT   Y1A 2J8   Canada
Phone : 867-667-4733
Fax : 867-667-2668
Email : yukontec@internorth.com
http://www.yukontec.com/ 

Nova Scotia

Nova Scotia Tourism Human Resource Council (NSTHRC)
2089 Maitland Street
Halifax NS   B3K 2Z8   Canada
Phone : 902-422-5853
Phone (alternate): 1-800-948-4267
Fax : 902-422-0184
Email : NSTHRC@tourism.ca
http://www.tourismhrc.com/ 

Ontario

Ontario Tourism Education Corporation (OTEC)
Suite 300 – 21 Four Seasons Place
Toronto ON   M9B 6J8   Canada
Phone : 416-622-1975
Phone (alternate): 1-800-557-6832
Fax : 416-622-7476
Email : info@otec.org
http://www.otec.org/ 

Prince Edward Island

Tourism Industry Association of Prince Edward Island (TIAPEI)
3rd Floor, 25 Queen Street, P.O. Box 2050
Charlottetown PE   C1A 7N7   Canada
Phone : 902-566-5008
Phone (alternate): 1-866-566-5008
Fax : 902-368-3605
Fax (alternate): 1-877-368-3605
Email : tiapei@tiapei.pe.ca
http://www.tiapei.pe.ca/ 

Quebec

Conseil québécois des ressources humaines en tourisme (CQRHT)
2751, boulevard Jacques-Cartier Est, Bureau 200
Longueuil QC   J4N 1L7   Canada
Phone : 450-651-1099
Fax : 450-651-1567
Email : info@cqrht.qc.ca
http://www.cqrht.qc.ca/ 

Saskatchewan

Saskatchewan Tourism Education Council (STEC)
202 Fourth Avenue North, Suite 102
Saskatoon SK   S7K 0k1   Canada
Phone : 306-933-5900
Phone (alternate): 1-800-331-1529
Fax : 306-933-6250
Email : stec@sasktourism.com
http://www.stec.com 

Yukon

Yukon Tourism Education Council (YTEC)
Suite C – 202 Strickland Street
Whitehorse YT   Y1A 2J8   Canada
Phone : 867-667-4733
Fax : 867-667-2668
Email : yukontec@internorth.com
http://www.yukontec.com/ 
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The new Skilled Trades Program

““The new Skilled Trades Program will address serious labour shortages that some regions of the country are facing, and will help grow Canada’s economy,” said Minister Kenney. “These long-overdue changes are part of the government’s plan to build a fast and flexible immigration system that is responsive to the needs of Canada’s economy. Canadian employers have long been asking for ways to get the skilled tradespeople they need to meet demands in many industries across the country. We’ve listened to their concerns and created this program in response.”

In the program’s first year, CIC will accept applications from up to 3,000 people in specific trades. The occupation list was designed to reflect current labour market needs and ensure the program delivers a diverse range of skilled tradespeople to fuel Canada’s economy. Within the 3,000, there will be no limit on 26 in-demand occupations, while 17 occupations will be subject to sub-limits of 100 applications each. In total, there are 43 occupations eligible for the Federal Skilled Trades Program. Applications are expected to be processed within 12 months.
In addition to being qualified for an eligible occupation, Federal Skilled Trades Program applicants must demonstrate basic language proficiency in either English or French at the Canadian Language Benchmark (CLB) level 5 for speaking and listening, and CLB 4 for reading and writing. This is due to the overall importance of language as a determinant of immigrant success and general health and safety reasons. CLB 4 is considered basic proficiency while those with CLB 5 can more effectively participate in and understand routine conversations.
Other criteria include: a valid offer of employment in Canada or a certificate of qualification from a province or territory in a qualifying skilled trade; at least two years of work experience in the occupation within the last five years; and meeting the employment requirements set out in the National Occupational Classification system, with the exception of licensing requirements, which are addressed separately.
“The Federal Skilled Trades Program is yet another tool in the Canadian employer’s toolkit to find the workers they need to build Canada’s future economy,” said Minister Kenney. “This new program, along with all other changes we are introducing, will help us move towards an immigration system that better supports Canada’s economic growth and long-term prosperity.”
Application forms for the Federal Skilled Trades Program can be found on the CIC website.
To avoid backlogs and ensure fast processing times, we will accept no more than 3,000 complete federal skilled trade applications to process in the first year (from January 2, 2013 to January 1, 2014).
Within the 3,000 cap, no more than 100 new applications for each job under Group A below will be considered for processing. There is no sub-cap for jobs under Group B.
Group A includes 17 jobs with a moderate labour market need. Group B includes 26 in-demand jobs. In total, 43 jobs will be eligible to apply under the Federal Skilled Trades program in the first year of the program. The specific codes from the 2011 version of the NOC are provided below as you must include this in your application form.
The caps apply whether or not people have a qualifying offer of employment or a certificate of qualification from a provincial or territorial apprenticeship authority.
Applications will be processed in the order we receive them.
Group A – Jobs with sub-caps of 100 applications each (and their corresponding 2011 NOC code)
  • 7202 Contractors and supervisors, electrical trades and telecommunications occupations
  • 7204 Contractors and supervisors, carpentry trades
  • 7205 Contractors and supervisors, other construction trades, installers, repairers and servicers
  • 7271 Carpenters
  • 7301 Contractors and supervisors, mechanic trades
  • 7302 Contractors and supervisors, heavy equipment operator crews
  • 8211 Supervisors, logging and forestry
  • 8221 Supervisors, mining and quarrying
  • 8222 Contractors and supervisors, oil and gas drilling services
  • 8241 Logging machinery operators
  • 8252 Agricultural service contractors, farm supervisors and specialized livestock workers
  • 9211 Supervisors, mineral and metal processing
  • 9212 Supervisors, petroleum, gas and chemical processing and utilities
  • 9214 Supervisors, plastic and rubber products manufacturing
  • 9231 Central control and process operators, mineral and metal processing
  • 9241 Power engineers and power systems operators
  • 9243 Water and waste treatment plant operators
Group B – no sub-caps (2011 NOC code)
  • 7231 Machinists and machining and tooling inspectors
  • 7233 Sheet metal workers
  • 7235 Structural metal and plate work fabricators and fitters
  • 7236 Ironworkers
  • 7237 Welders and related machine operators
  • 7241 Electricians (except industrial and power system)
  • 7242 Industrial electricians
  • 7243 Power system electricians
  • 7244 Electrical power line and cable workers
  • 7245 Telecommunications line and cable workers
  • 7246 Telecommunications installation and repair workers
  • 7251 Plumbers
  • 7252 Steamfitters, pipefitters and sprinkler system installers
  • 7253 Gas fitters
  • 7311 Construction millwrights and industrial mechanics
  • 7312 Heavy-duty equipment mechanics
  • 7313 Refrigeration and air conditioning mechanics
  • 7314 Railway carmen/women
  • 7315 Aircraft mechanics and aircraft inspectors
  • 7318 Elevator constructors and mechanics
  • 7371 Crane operators
  • 7372 Drillers and blasters – surface, mining, quarrying and construction
  • 7373 Water well drillers
  • 8231 Underground production and development miners
  • 8232 Oil and gas well drillers, servicers, testers and related workers
  • 9232 Petroleum, gas and chemical process operators
You must complete your applications according to the requirements in place at the time you apply.
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New Parent and Grandparent program re-opens January 2, 2014

Matti

Matti (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Matti (Photo credit: Wikipedia)
Mississauga, May 10, 2013 — Citizenship and Immigration Canada will re-open the Parent and Grandparent (PGP) program for new applications on January 2, 2014, by which time the backlog and wait times in the program are expected to have been cut in half.
“The Action Plan for Faster Family Reunification is on track to meet the goals of cutting in half the backlog and wait times in the Parent and Grandparent program,” said Citizenship, Immigration and Multiculturalism Minister Jason Kenney. “It is very important that we continue to make progress and not return to the old broken system with wait times as long as a decade—that would be unfair to families.”
Phase II of the Action Plan for Faster Family Reunification will provide even faster processing times, reduce the backlog further, prevent future backlogs, ensure that families have the financial means to support those they sponsor, and protect the interests of taxpayers.
First – In 2012 and 2013, Canada will admit 50,000 parents and grandparents as permanent residents. This represents the highest level of parents and grandparents admitted in 20 years. In 2014, Canada will maintain high levels of admissions for parents and grandparents.
Second – The Super Visa will become permanent and will continue to provide flexibility for families who access the 10-year multiple-entry visa, allowing visa holders to remain in Canada up to two years at a time. Over 15,000 Super Visas have been issued since the program’s launch in December 2011 with approval rates averaging 86 percent.
Third – New qualifying criteria for permanent residency sponsorship of parents and grandparents will increase the financial responsibility of sponsors to ensure they have the means to support those they sponsor, while limiting the program’s cost to taxpayers and Canada’s strained health and social programs.
Fourth – 5,000 new sponsorship applications will be accepted in the program in 2014. By accepting 5,000 applications in 2014 while maintaining high levels, the government will be able to further reduce the remaining backlog so that families can be reunited more quickly.
“These new criteria ensure sponsored family members are well supported by their sponsors throughout their time in Canada,” said Minister Kenney. “The redesigned Parent and Grandparent program reunites families faster while respecting Canadian taxpayers and the limited resources for health and social programs.”
Canada has one of the most generous family reunification programs in the world. The United States, United Kingdom, Australia and New Zealand do not allow grandparents to be sponsored at all or only in very limited circumstances, and they have very restrictive criteria for the sponsorship of parents.
The amendments to the Immigration and Refugee Protection Regulations that are being proposed will be pre-published in theCanada Gazette (Part I) and the public will be able to comment for a 30-day period.
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Action Plan for Faster Family Reunification: Phase II

English: A grandfather teaching his little gra...
English: A grandfather teaching his little granddaughter how to ride a kick scooter. Simmering, Vienna, Austria, June 2006. Photo by KF. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)
With the backlog and wait times being cut in half, Phase II of that Action Plan for Faster Family Reunification will build on that success with further backlog reduction and even faster processing times.

First: Maintain high admissions

In 2012 and 2013, Canada will admit 50,000 parents and grandparents. This represents the highest level in 20 years. In 2014, Canada will maintain high levels of admissions for parents and grandparents.
This will help reunite more families and enable further backlog reduction.

Second: Make the Super Visa a permanent program

The Super Visa will become a permanent program and will continue to provide flexibility for families who can access the 10-year multiple-entry visa that allows parents and grandparents to remain in Canada up to two years at a time. The Super Visa is very popular. Over 1,000 Super Visas are issued each month, with over 15,000 Super Visas issued since its launch in December 2011 and approval rates remain high at 86 percent.

Third: New qualifying criteria for permanent residency sponsorship

New qualifying criteria ensure that sponsors have the financial means to support parents and grandparents, while reducing the net costs to Canadian taxpayers by leading to less reliance on health care and social programs.
The new qualifying criteria include:
  • Increase minimum necessary income (MNI) for sponsoring parents and grandparents equivalent by 30 percent: The current MNI does not accurately reflect the increased costs associated with being financially responsible for elderly parents and grandparents. The modest increase in the MNI will ensure sponsors are able to meet the financial needs of their sponsored parents and grandparents, which will reduce the net costs to Canadian taxpayers.
  • Lengthen period for demonstrating the MNI from one year to three years:  Individuals who seek to sponsor their parents and grandparents and their accompanying family members will be required to demonstrate that they meet the new income threshold for the three consecutive tax years prior to submitting the sponsorship application. Requiring prospective sponsors of parents and grandparents to provide evidence of income over a three-year period, as opposed to 12 months, will help ensure sponsors have income stability and the financial means to provide for the basic needs of their parents and grandparents. It will also guarantee that prospective sponsors are contributing to the public services their sponsored family members are likely to use (for example, provincial health care, public transportation, etc.).
  • Evidence of income confined to documents issued by the Canada Revenue Agency (CRA): Individuals who seek to sponsor their parents and grandparents and their accompanying family members will be required to demonstrate that they meet the new income threshold for three consecutive years using CRA notices of assessment. This will mean that officials could spend less time reviewing and verifying documents and could help speed up processing times even further. It will also guarantee that prospective sponsors are contributing to the public services their sponsored family members are likely to use (for example, provincial health care, public transportation, etc.).
  • Extend the sponsorship undertaking period to 20 years instead of 10 years:  The current sponsorship undertaking period for parents and grandparents is 10 years.  Individuals who seek to sponsor their parents and grandparents and accompanying family members will be required to commit to a lengthened sponsorship undertaking period of 20 years. This means sponsors and co-signers (if applicable) will be responsible for repaying any provincial social assistance benefits paid to the parent and grandparent and their accompanying family members for 20 years. A lengthened sponsorship undertaking will protect Canadian taxpayers and ensure sponsors assume more financial responsibility for the basic needs of their parents and grandparents over a longer period of time, as well as for health care costs not covered by provincial health care (for example, eye care, dental care, mobility aids, etc.).
  • Changing the maximum age of dependents: The maximum age of dependents will be set at 18 years of age and under for all immigration programs, including the Parent and Grandparent program. This is in line with the standard age of majority in Canada. Those over the age of 18 can apply to visit or immigrate to Canada independently. There will be an exception for individuals, regardless of age, who are financially dependent on their parents due to a mental or physical disability.

Fourth: Accepting 5,000 applications in 2014

By accepting 5,000 applications in 2014 while maintaining high levels of admissions of parents and grandparents, the government will be able to further reduce the remaining backlog so that families can be reunited even more quickly. Opening the program to an unlimited number of applications as was done in the past will grow the backlog again and increase wait times, undoing the progress made to date.
For additional information on the proposal to redesign of the PGP program, please consult the draft regulatory package.

Medical Laboratory Technologist in Canada.

English: MLS in his work environment.

English: MLS in his work environment. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

English: MLS in his work environment. (Photo credit:Wikipedia)
The profession of medical laboratory technologist is a regulated one in the provinces of Alberta, Manitoba, New Brunswick, Newfoundland and Labrador, Nova Scotia, Ontario, Quebec and Saskatchewan. The profession is not regulated in the provinces of British Columbia, Prince Edward Island, Newfoundland and Labrador, and the Territories.
Appropriate provincial and territorial regulatory bodies set the rules and regulations for entry into the profession and issue licenses to those who meet the qualifications.By law, you are not allowed to work as a medical laboratory technologist in any province where it is regulated, if you haven’t been issued a license by the regulatory body there.
The Canadian Society for Medical Laboratory Science(CSMLS) is the national certifying body and professional association for medical laboratory technologists and medical laboratory assistants. The CSMLS conduct examinations for general medical laboratory technology, diagnostic cytology, clinical genetics and medical laboratory assistants. It works in partnership with provincial regulatory bodies, does advocacy work and certifies people in the profession. Its certification is accepted across Canada and required by the provinces and territories that do not have yet an individual regulatory body.
To improve your chances of success to practice your profession in your future country, there are many steps that you can take before immigrating to Canada:
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Coming to Canada as a Nurse – The Process

Permanent Resident Card (2002-2007)

Permanent Resident Card (2002-2007) (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Permanent Resident Card (2002-2007) (Photo credit: Wikipedia)
In our last edition, CIC News explained how Canada has opened its doors to welcome internationally educated nurses. This article will focus on the different ways a nurse can come to Canada to work and live. As the demand for nurses continues to grow, nurses are presented with the opportunity to seek either permanent or temporary residency in Canada.
A registered nurse or licensed practical nurse seeking permanent residency in Canada is invited to discover the benefits of the Quebec Skilled Worker (QSW) immigration program. Nurses with international credentials may also seek temporary residency in Canada if they obtain a valid job offer and subsequent work permit. Once working in Canada on a temporary basis, permanent residency options may later present themselves through alternate immigration programs.
Permanent Residency: The Quebec Option:
The Province of Quebec has implemented an immigration policy that reflects its high demand for nurses. With high salaries, available jobs and a rapidly expanding healthcare system, Quebec seeks to bring the best international nursing professionals to its cities and towns. The QSW program, the province’s most popular program for permanent residency, has been set up in a way that benefits qualified nurses.
The QSW program offers internationally educated nurses an opportunity to seek permanent residency in Canada without the need to secure a job offer. The QSW program is a points-based selection system and points are awarded for various factors which include age, education, area of training, work experience, language ability etc. If an applicant scores enough points to reach the pass-mark, he or she will generally qualify for a Quebec Selection Certificate, which ultimately leads to a Canadian permanent resident visa, in the absence of health and/or security issues.
The QSW selection criteria awards a significant number of points for French language ability. However, under this program many nurses are able to score enough points to reach the pass mark without obtaining any points for French language ability. This is because nurses are able to earn very high points for the “area of training” selection factor as well as high points for their education.
To find out more about the QSW program and its selection factors, please click here.
Temporary Residency: The Work Permit Option:
As the Canadian Nurses Association (CNA) is predicting a continued shortage of nurses in the future, nursing jobs in the country are more plentiful than ever. Internationally educated nurses may apply to work temporarily in Canada. Temporary residency for foreign trained nurses may be achieved if the applicant secures a valid job offer and subsequently, a work permit.
To begin this process, an applicant with a nursing degree from outside Canada must have their educational credentials assessed. Since educational credentials can be assessed from both inside and outside Canada, applicants are given the option to remain in their country of residence during the assessment process.
After educational credentials have been assessed, applicants must register as a nurse in Canada. When this has been completed, an applicant may initiate the process of obtaining a job offer and work permit in Canada. To facilitate the process of finding a job offer, some individual provinces have implemented services helping connect internationally educated nurses to employment opportunities in healthcare communities.
Once working in Canada on temporary basis, an applicant looking for permanent residency may then explore their immigration options through programs such as the Canadian Experience Class or Provincial Nominee programs.
How to register as a nurse in Canada:
Any nurse planning to work in Canada must be deemed as qualified to practice as a Registered Nurse (RN) or Licensed/Registered Practical Nurse (LPN/RPN). To qualify, an applicant must register with either the Canadian Nurses Association (CAN) or the Canadian Council for Practical Nurse Regulators (CCPNR).
In Canada registration requirements are established by individual provinces and territories. To register with the CNA or CCPNR, nurses must first apply to the nursing regulatory body of the province or territory where they wish to work:
In general, in order to be eligible to register as an RN or LPN, an applicant will need to demonstrate competency to practice. To demonstrate this, an applicant will need to have their education credentials assessed. Once education credentials are deemed equivalent to nursing education programs in Canada, the nursing regulatory body will then address whether other application requirements are met. Additional application requirements generally include criteria such as work experience, good character, language proficiency, screening for criminal history and registration in the jurisdiction where the applicant currently practices.
Once a positive assessment of the application requirements has been met, Canadian provinces and territories, with the exception of Quebec, require that nurses write the Canadian Registered Nurse Examination (CRNE) or Canadian Practical Nurse Registration Exam (CPNRE) as part of the registration or licensure process (the province of Quebec maintains its own registration examination). At present, these exams can only be written in Canada. Once an applicant has successfully completed the required examination, the applicant may be eligible to work as a nurse in Canada.
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Bridging Open Work Permit Helps Workers Stay in Canada

Work Permit

Work Permit (Photo credit: Cliph)

Work Permit (Photo credit: Cliph)
Canada is committed to retaining the talented temporary foreign workers it needs to ensure continued economic growth. This includes making sure that temporary foreign workers are able to make a smooth transition to Canadian Permanent Residency if they so choose.
Beginning on December 15th, 2012, the Government of Canadaintroduced the Bridging Open Work Permit. This permit helps temporary foreign workers remain in Canada during their permanent residency application process. This takes pressure off of both workers and their Canadian employers, and allows them to continue working in Canada while waiting to hear word on the immigration application.
What is the Bridging Open Work Permit (BWP)?
It is not unusual for a foreign worker to realize that their temporary work permit is set to expire during the course of their permanent residency application process. Before the BWP, they were required to undergo the lengthy process of applying for work permit renewal if they wished to continue working in Canada. If a work permit could not be obtained, the individual (and their family) had the choice to either stay in Canada as a visitor, thus foregoing an income from work, or to leave the country until a permanent resident visa was issued.
Now, existing temporary foreign workers can apply for an Open BWP as long as they:
  • are currently in Canada;
  • have valid status on a work permit that is due to expire within 4 months;
  • have received confirmation from Citizenship and Immigration Canada (CIC) that their permanent resident application under the Federal Skilled Worker Program, Canadian Experience Class, Federal Skilled Trades Program, or a Provincial Nominee Program is eligible for processing
Do you have Confirmation of Eligibility for your PR Application?
The confirmation of eligibility is usually issued for applications under the Federal Skilled Worker Program when a positive Final Determination of Eligibility letter has been sent or emailed by the Central Intake Office (CIO). For the Canadian Experience Class , the Federal Skilled Trades Program , and the Provincial Nominee Programs, confirmation of eligibility is usually communicated when an Acknowledgement of Receipt has been sent by letter or email.
If you do not have either of these documents, you will need to contact CIC or request a copy of the notes relating to your Immigration application to determine whether your PR application has been found eligible for processing.
Receiving a Bridging Open Work Permit
A BWP is valid for 1 year after its issuance. During this time, it should be possible for an individual to receive a decision on their permanent residency application. If no decision is received, a request for extension of a BWP will be considered on a case-by-case basis.
If an applicant is applying for permanent residency through a Provincial Nominee Program, the open work permit will be restricted to the specific province the applicant has applied to.
“This work permit offers some long-awaited help to both foreign workers and employers alike,” said Attorney David Cohen. “By allowing foreign workers to easily stay and work while their permanent residency application is being processed, the Canadian government is underscoring just how highly they value these individuals.”
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7 Keys To Getting A NAFTA Work Permit As a Professional

English: Map of the Tratado de Libre Comercio ...

English: Map of the Tratado de Libre Comercio (TLC or NAFTA in English) (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

English: Map of the Tratado de Libre Comercio (TLC or NAFTA in English) (Photo credit: Wikipedia)
Did you know that certain professionals can work in Canada under the North American Free Trade Agreement(NAFTA)? They can do so without going through the normal requirement of obtaining a labour market opinion that most other temporary workers (and employers) must do.
In this post, I’ll discuss what I consider to be the seven keys to obtaining a work permit in the professional category under NAFTA.
1. You must be a citizen of the USA or Mexico
Only citizens of the USA and Mexico qualify as NAFTA applicants.  Individuals who are permanent residents of either country (e.g., green card holders in the USA) do not qualify under NAFTA.
Citizens of Guam, the Northern Mariana Islands, American Samoa and the U.S. Virgin Islands are also excluded from NAFTA and can not obtain work permits through NAFTA.
However, citizens of the District of Columbia and Puerto Rico can apply through NAFTA.
2. Your profession or occupation must be listed in NAFTA
Not all professionals can qualify for a work permit under NAFTA.  There are 60 listed qualifying professions and occupations, and your training and experience must fall within one of them.
3. You must have a job or contract in Canada
As a professional, you can not obtain a work permit without first having a job offer in Canada, or a professional service contract with a Canadian firm.  You can be an employee of a US or Mexican firm who does business with a Canadian company.
4. You must apply for the correct length of work permit
NAFTA work permits are issued for a maximum of three years initially.  However, they are renewable for additional three periods if the applicant still qualifies.  In my experience, it is best to apply for the length of permit you need that reflects the employment or service contract you have, to a maximum of three years in the first application.
5.  You should apply to the correct visa office
As a NAFTA professional, you have the choice to apply at a port of entry (i.e., the border or airport), or at a visa office (currently either New York for US citizens, or Mexico City for Mexican citizens).
In my experience – if you have the time – it is best to apply at a visa office if at all possible.  It is far better to arrive at the border with work permit in hand rather than apply there.
I know of situations where the border officer was reluctant to issue a work permit (perhaps because the documentation wasn’t quite right), and told the applicant to leave and apply through a visa office.
If your time is tight, then by all means apply at a port of entry.  But be absolutely certain your supporting documentation is absolutely impeccable.
6. You must have the correct supporting documentation
I won’t go into detail regarding all of the supporting documentation required, as it will vary depending on the facts of each case.
Generally speaking, you first need to prove citizenship with a passport and/or birth certificate. You must have solid evidence that you actually qualify as a professional.  This would include official transcripts from the institution where you did your training, including a copy of your degree or diploma.  Certificates of membership in a professional organization (if applicable) would also be necessary.
As well, you should have letters of reference or employment contracts from previous employers to show your experience in the field.
Finally, you’ll need a copy of your employment agreement with a Canadian firm (or service contract), with a contact phone number and address in Canada.  The agreement must provide details of your duties in Canada (and those duties must match your NAFTA professional category), salary, length of employment, and so forth.
7. You must be entering Canada on a temporary basis
I suppose I should say that you must be able to show that you are entering Canada on a temporary basis. Just stating this fact to the visa officer is not good enough.
Bring evidence of your connections to the US or Mexico.  Evidence of assets held (including real estate, investments, bank accounts and vehicles) are crucial.
Provide evidence of family connections in the US or Mexico if you have them.  Showing your history of employment in the US or Mexico is always a very good idea as well, or any commitments that you have to return to (such as service contracts, clients or other employment in your home country).
As with all my posts, this post can not be considered legal advice, as your situation is unique and many factors will influence whether you are successful in obtaining a NAFTA work permit.
If you’ve found this blog post useful, please feel free to share it with your social network, or link to it from your blog or website.
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Professions Covered by NAFTA

English: A North American Free Trade Agreement...

English: A North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) Logo. Español: Logotipo del Tratado de Libre Comercio de América del Norte (TLCAN). Français : Logo de Accord de libre-échange nord-américain (ALENA). (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

The following professions are covered by Appendix 1603.D.1 of the North American Free Trade Agreement. For more information on obtaining a TN Visa, please consult the relevant section of this website.

 
Profession1 Minimum Education Requirements or Alternative Credentials
General
Accountant Baccalaureate or Licenciatura Degree; or C.P.A., C.A., C.G.A. or C.M.A.
Architect Baccalaureate or Licenciatura Degree; or state/provincial license2
Computer Systems Analyst Baccalaureate or Licenciatura Degree; or Post-Secondary Diploma3 or Post-Secondary Certificate4, and three years experience
Disaster Relief Insurance Claims Adjuster (claims Adjuster employed by an insurance company located in the territory of a Party, or an independent claims adjuster) Baccalaureate or Licenciatura Degree, and successful completion of training in the appropriate areas of insurance adjustment pertaining to disaster relief claims; or three years experience in claims adjustment and successful completion of training in the appropriate areas of insurance adjustment pertaining to disaster relief claims
Economist Baccalaureate or Licenciatura Degree
Engineer Baccalaureate or Licenciatura Degree; or state/provincial license
Forester Baccalaureate or Licenciatura Degree; or state/provincial license
Graphic Designer Baccalaureate or Licenciatura Degree; or Post-Secondary Diploma or Post-Secondary Certificate, and three years experience
Hotel Manager Baccalaureate or Licenciatura Degree in hotel/restaurant management; or Post-Secondary Diploma or Post-Secondary Certificate in hotel/restaurant management, and three years experience in hotel/restaurant management
Industrial Designer Baccalaureate or Licenciatura Degree; or Post-Secondary Diploma or Post-Secondary Certificate, and three years experience
Interior Designer Baccalaureate or Licenciatura Degree; or Post-Secondary Diploma or Post-Secondary Certificate, and three years experience
Land Surveyor Baccalaureate or Licenciatura Degree; or state/provincial/federal license
Landscape Architect Baccalaureate or Licenciatura Degree
Lawyer (including Notary in the Province of Quebec) LL.B., J.D., LL.L., B.C.L. or Licenciatura Degree (five years); or membership in a state/provincial bar
Librarian M.L.S. or B.L.S. (for which another Baccalaureate or Licenciatura Degree was a prerequisite)
Management Consultant Baccalaureate or Licenciatura Degree; or equivalent professional experience as established by statement or professional credential attesting to five years experience as a management consultant, or five years experience in a field of specialty related to the consulting agreement
Mathematician (including Statistician) Baccalaureate or Licenciatura Degree
Range Manager/Range Conservationalist Baccalaureate or Licenciatura Degree
Research Assistant (working in a post-secondary educational institution) Baccalaureate or Licenciatura Degree
Scientific Technician/Technologist5 Possession of:
(a) a theoretical knowledge of any of the following disciplines: agricultural sciences, astronomy, biology, chemistry, engineering, forestry, geology, geophysics, meteorology or physics; and
(b) the ability to solve practical problems in any of those disciplines, or the ability to apply principles of any of those disciplines to basic or applied research
Social Worker Baccalaureate or Licenciatura Degree
Sylviculturist (including Forestry Specialist) Baccalaureate or Licenciatura Degree
Technical Publications Writer Baccalaureate or Licenciatura Degree; or Post-Secondary Diploma or Post-Secondary Certificate, and three years experience
Urban Planner (including Geographer) Baccalaureate or Licenciatura Degree
Vocational Counsellor Baccalaureate or Licenciatura Degree
Medical/Allied Professional
Dentist D.D.S., D.M.D., Doctor en Odontologia or Doctor en Cirugia Dental; or state/provincial license
Dietitian Baccalaureate or Licenciatura Degree; or state/provincial license
Medical Laboratory Technologist (Canada)/Medical Technologist (Mexico and the United States)6 Baccalaureate or Licenciatura Degree; or Post-Secondary Diploma or Post-Secondary Certificate, and three years experience
Nutritionist Baccalaureate or Licenciatura Degree
Occupational Therapist Baccalaureate or Licenciatura Degree; or state/provincial license
Pharmacist Baccalaureate or Licenciatura Degree; or state/provincial license
Physician (teaching or research only) M.D. or Doctor en Medicina; or state/provincial license
Physiotherapist/Physical Therapist Baccalaureate or Licenciatura Degree; or state/provincial license
Psychologist State/provincial license; or Licenciatura Degree
Recreational Therapist Baccalaureate or Licenciatura Degree
Registered Nurse State/provincial license; or Licenciatura Degree
Veterinarian D.V.M., D.M.V. or Doctor en Veterinaria; or state/provincial license
Scientist
Agriculturist (including Agronomist) Baccalaureate or Licenciatura Degree
Animal Breeder Baccalaureate or Licenciatura Degree
Animal Scientist Baccalaureate or Licenciatura Degree
Apiculturist Baccalaureate or Licenciatura Degree
Astronomer Baccalaureate or Licenciatura Degree
Biochemist Baccalaureate or Licenciatura Degree
Biologist Baccalaureate or Licenciatura Degree
Chemist Baccalaureate or Licenciatura Degree
Dairy Scientist Baccalaureate or Licenciatura Degree
Entomologist Baccalaureate or Licenciatura Degree
Epidemiologist Baccalaureate or Licenciatura Degree
Geneticist Baccalaureate or Licenciatura Degree
Geologist Baccalaureate or Licenciatura Degree
Geochemist Baccalaureate or Licenciatura Degree
Geophysicist (including Oceanographer in Mexico and the United States) Baccalaureate or Licenciatura Degree
Horticulturist Baccalaureate or Licenciatura Degree
Meteorologist Baccalaureate or Licenciatura Degree
Pharmacologist Baccalaureate or Licenciatura Degree
Physicist (including Oceanographer in Canada) Baccalaureate or Licenciatura Degree
Plant Breeder Baccalaureate or Licenciatura Degree
Poultry Scientist Baccalaureate or Licenciatura Degree
Soil Scientist Baccalaureate or Licenciatura Degree
Zoologist Baccalaureate or Licenciatura Degree
Teacher
College Baccalaureate or Licenciatura Degree
Seminary Baccalaureate or Licenciatura Degree
University Baccalaureate or Licenciatura Degree
1. A business person seeking temporary entry under this Appendix may also perform training functions relating to the profession, including conducting seminars.
2. “State/provincial license” and “state/provincial/federal license” mean any document issued by a state, provincial or federal government, as the case may be, or under its authority, but not by a local government, that permits a person to engage in a regulated activity or profession.
3. “Post-Secondary Diploma” means a credential issued, on completion of two or more years of post-secondary education, by an accredited academic institution in Canada or the United States.
4. “Post-Secondary Certificate” means a certificate issued, on completion of two or more years of post-secondary education at an academic institution, by the federal government of Mexico or a state government in Mexico, an academic institution recognized by the federal government or a state government, or an academic institution created by federal or state law.
5. A business person in this category must be seeking temporary entry to work in direct support of professionals in agricultural sciences, astronomy, biology, chemistry, engineering, forestry, geology, geophysics, meteorology or physics.
6. A business person in this category must be seeking temporary entry to perform in a laboratory chemical, biological, hematological, immunologic, microscopic or bacteriological tests and analyses for diagnosis, treatment or prevention of disease.
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