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Information for foreign-trained line cooks

Chef Parking

Chef Parking (Photo credits: http://www.myparkingsign.com)

(6322) Verified: 2013 02 13

Information on requirements to practise

This trade has been designated as an Interprovincial Standards Red Seal Trade, which means that all provinces and territories have jointly agreed on certification standards. The Interprovincial Standards “Red Seal” Examinations are administered through the provincial and territorial apprenticeship and training or certification offices. Holders of a Red Seal Certificate are exempt from further examination when moving between participating provinces and territories. A Red Seal Certificate may be required by some employers as a condition for employment. To obtain more information about the Red Seal Certificate, contact:

 

Canadian Council of Directors of Apprenticeship (CCDA)
Red Seal Program / Programme du Sceau rouge
Gatineau QC   K1A 0J9   Canada
Email : redseal-sceaurouge@hrsdc-rhdsc.gc.ca
http://red-seal.ca/c.4nt.1cts@-eng.jsp 

 

For a general description of duties and employment requirements for this occupation, you can refer to the information page on line cooks prepared by the Canadian Tourism Human Resource Council (CTHRC), a not-for-profit, government-funded sector council.

 

Canadian Tourism Human Resource Council (CTHRC)
151 Slater, Suite/Bureau 608
Ottawa ON   K1P 5H3   Canada
Phone : +1-613-231-6949
Email : info@cthrc.ca
http://www.cthrc.ca/ 

 

You may want to take the Discover Tourism Quiz to see if you are suited for this occupation. Employers set the educational requirements as well as the levels of training and experience they expect of applicants.emerit Professional Certification is an asset for line cooks.

The emerit Professional Certification

One of the most widely recognized certificates for this occupation in Canada is the emerit Professional Certification. No formal training is required to achieve this certification, and the knowledge exam, which is the first step in the process, can be taken on-line from anywhere in the world. The emerit certification system is designed to recognize individuals who have mastered the required skills and have met the standards of their profession in a practical job setting. This certificate is based on industry-defined standards and has been developed by the Canadian Tourism Human Resource Council (CTHRC).

For more information about emerit Professional Certification for this occupation, consult theinformation page on the emerit web site, or contact an emerit representative:

 

emerit Tourism Training
     
Phone : +1-613-231-6949
Phone (alternate): 1-800-486-9158
Fax : +1-613-231-6853
Email : info@emerit.ca
http://www.emerit.ca/ 

 

 

Once you know where you will settle and work in Canada, you may want to contact the appropriate local Tourism Human Resource Organization (see list below) for further assistance.

Information on assessment of qualifications

The provincial and territorial apprenticeship and training or certification offices are not set up to assess foreign qualifications prior to your arrival in Canada.

We invite you to consult our Fact Sheet No. 2, “Assessment and recognition of credentials for the purpose of employment in Canada.” We draw to your attention question 8: What is a trade and what is a Red Seal Trade?

 

Other relevant information

For a list of related job titles also used for this occupation, and a general description of duties and employment requirements, you can refer to the information prepared by Human Resources and Skills Development Canada regarding:

You may as well be interested by the information for foreign-trained executive chefs.

For additional information on the tourism industry in Canada, whether you are an employer or you are considering a career in that sector, you may want to explore the following link(s):

Specific Provincial/Territorial Information

 


flechevertehaut.gif List of provincial/territorial Tourism Human Resource Organizations

 

Alberta

Alberta Hotel & Lodging Association (AHLA)
2707 Ellwood Dr SW
Edmonton AB   T6X 0P7   Canada
Phone : 780-436-6112
Phone (alternate): 1-888-436-6112
Fax : 780-436-5404
Email : info@ahla.ca
http://www.ahla.ca 

British Columbia

go2 – The resource for people in Tourism
Suite 450, One Bentall Centre,
505 Burrard Street, P.O. Box 59
Vancouver BC   V7X 1M3   Canada
Phone : 604-633-9787
Phone (alternate): 604-633-9798
Fax : 604-633-9796
Email : info@go2hr.ca
http://www.go2hr.ca 

Manitoba

Manitoba Tourism Education Council (MTEC)
75 Scurfield Boulevard, Unit 3
Winnipeg MB   R3Y 1P6   Canada
Phone : 204-957-7437
Phone (alternate): 1-800-820-6832
Fax : 204-956-1700
Email : info@mtec.mb.ca
http://www.mtec.mb.ca 

New Brunswick

Tourism Industry Association of New Brunswick (TIANB)
500 Beaverbrook Court
4th Floor, Suite 440/4e étage, bureau 440
Fredericton NB   E3B 5X4   Canada
Phone : 506-458-5646
Phone (alternate): 1-800-668-5313
Fax : 506-459-3634
Email : info@tianb.com
http://www.tianb.com/ 

Newfoundland and Labrador

Hospitality Newfoundland and Labrador (HNL)
71 Goldstone Street (Suite 102)
St. John’s NL   A1B 5C3   Canada
Phone : 709-722-2000
Phone (alternate): 1-800-563-0700
Fax : 709-722-8104
Email : hospitality@hnl.ca
http://www.hnl.ca 

Northwest Territories

Yukon Tourism Education Council (YTEC)
Suite C – 202 Strickland Street
Whitehorse YT   Y1A 2J8   Canada
Phone : 867-667-4733
Fax : 867-667-2668
Email : yukontec@internorth.com
http://www.yukontec.com/ 

Nova Scotia

Nova Scotia Tourism Human Resource Council (NSTHRC)
2089 Maitland Street
Halifax NS   B3K 2Z8   Canada
Phone : 902-422-5853
Phone (alternate): 1-800-948-4267
Fax : 902-422-0184
Email : NSTHRC@tourism.ca
http://www.tourismhrc.com/ 

Ontario

Ontario Tourism Education Corporation (OTEC)
Suite 300 – 21 Four Seasons Place
Toronto ON   M9B 6J8   Canada
Phone : 416-622-1975
Phone (alternate): 1-800-557-6832
Fax : 416-622-7476
Email : info@otec.org
http://www.otec.org/ 

Prince Edward Island

Tourism Industry Association of Prince Edward Island (TIAPEI)
3rd Floor, 25 Queen Street, P.O. Box 2050
Charlottetown PE   C1A 7N7   Canada
Phone : 902-566-5008
Phone (alternate): 1-866-566-5008
Fax : 902-368-3605
Fax (alternate): 1-877-368-3605
Email : tiapei@tiapei.pe.ca
http://www.tiapei.pe.ca/ 

Quebec

Conseil québécois des ressources humaines en tourisme (CQRHT)
2751, boulevard Jacques-Cartier Est, Bureau 200
Longueuil QC   J4N 1L7   Canada
Phone : 450-651-1099
Fax : 450-651-1567
Email : info@cqrht.qc.ca
http://www.cqrht.qc.ca/ 

Saskatchewan

Saskatchewan Tourism Education Council (STEC)
202 Fourth Avenue North, Suite 102
Saskatoon SK   S7K 0k1   Canada
Phone : 306-933-5900
Phone (alternate): 1-800-331-1529
Fax : 306-933-6250
Email : stec@sasktourism.com
http://www.stec.com 

Yukon

Yukon Tourism Education Council (YTEC)
Suite C – 202 Strickland Street
Whitehorse YT   Y1A 2J8   Canada
Phone : 867-667-4733
Fax : 867-667-2668
Email : yukontec@internorth.com
http://www.yukontec.com/ 
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Medical Laboratory Technologist in Canada.

English: MLS in his work environment.

English: MLS in his work environment. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

English: MLS in his work environment. (Photo credit:Wikipedia)
The profession of medical laboratory technologist is a regulated one in the provinces of Alberta, Manitoba, New Brunswick, Newfoundland and Labrador, Nova Scotia, Ontario, Quebec and Saskatchewan. The profession is not regulated in the provinces of British Columbia, Prince Edward Island, Newfoundland and Labrador, and the Territories.
Appropriate provincial and territorial regulatory bodies set the rules and regulations for entry into the profession and issue licenses to those who meet the qualifications.By law, you are not allowed to work as a medical laboratory technologist in any province where it is regulated, if you haven’t been issued a license by the regulatory body there.
The Canadian Society for Medical Laboratory Science(CSMLS) is the national certifying body and professional association for medical laboratory technologists and medical laboratory assistants. The CSMLS conduct examinations for general medical laboratory technology, diagnostic cytology, clinical genetics and medical laboratory assistants. It works in partnership with provincial regulatory bodies, does advocacy work and certifies people in the profession. Its certification is accepted across Canada and required by the provinces and territories that do not have yet an individual regulatory body.
To improve your chances of success to practice your profession in your future country, there are many steps that you can take before immigrating to Canada:
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Coming to Canada as a Nurse – The Process

Permanent Resident Card (2002-2007)

Permanent Resident Card (2002-2007) (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Permanent Resident Card (2002-2007) (Photo credit: Wikipedia)
In our last edition, CIC News explained how Canada has opened its doors to welcome internationally educated nurses. This article will focus on the different ways a nurse can come to Canada to work and live. As the demand for nurses continues to grow, nurses are presented with the opportunity to seek either permanent or temporary residency in Canada.
A registered nurse or licensed practical nurse seeking permanent residency in Canada is invited to discover the benefits of the Quebec Skilled Worker (QSW) immigration program. Nurses with international credentials may also seek temporary residency in Canada if they obtain a valid job offer and subsequent work permit. Once working in Canada on a temporary basis, permanent residency options may later present themselves through alternate immigration programs.
Permanent Residency: The Quebec Option:
The Province of Quebec has implemented an immigration policy that reflects its high demand for nurses. With high salaries, available jobs and a rapidly expanding healthcare system, Quebec seeks to bring the best international nursing professionals to its cities and towns. The QSW program, the province’s most popular program for permanent residency, has been set up in a way that benefits qualified nurses.
The QSW program offers internationally educated nurses an opportunity to seek permanent residency in Canada without the need to secure a job offer. The QSW program is a points-based selection system and points are awarded for various factors which include age, education, area of training, work experience, language ability etc. If an applicant scores enough points to reach the pass-mark, he or she will generally qualify for a Quebec Selection Certificate, which ultimately leads to a Canadian permanent resident visa, in the absence of health and/or security issues.
The QSW selection criteria awards a significant number of points for French language ability. However, under this program many nurses are able to score enough points to reach the pass mark without obtaining any points for French language ability. This is because nurses are able to earn very high points for the “area of training” selection factor as well as high points for their education.
To find out more about the QSW program and its selection factors, please click here.
Temporary Residency: The Work Permit Option:
As the Canadian Nurses Association (CNA) is predicting a continued shortage of nurses in the future, nursing jobs in the country are more plentiful than ever. Internationally educated nurses may apply to work temporarily in Canada. Temporary residency for foreign trained nurses may be achieved if the applicant secures a valid job offer and subsequently, a work permit.
To begin this process, an applicant with a nursing degree from outside Canada must have their educational credentials assessed. Since educational credentials can be assessed from both inside and outside Canada, applicants are given the option to remain in their country of residence during the assessment process.
After educational credentials have been assessed, applicants must register as a nurse in Canada. When this has been completed, an applicant may initiate the process of obtaining a job offer and work permit in Canada. To facilitate the process of finding a job offer, some individual provinces have implemented services helping connect internationally educated nurses to employment opportunities in healthcare communities.
Once working in Canada on temporary basis, an applicant looking for permanent residency may then explore their immigration options through programs such as the Canadian Experience Class or Provincial Nominee programs.
How to register as a nurse in Canada:
Any nurse planning to work in Canada must be deemed as qualified to practice as a Registered Nurse (RN) or Licensed/Registered Practical Nurse (LPN/RPN). To qualify, an applicant must register with either the Canadian Nurses Association (CAN) or the Canadian Council for Practical Nurse Regulators (CCPNR).
In Canada registration requirements are established by individual provinces and territories. To register with the CNA or CCPNR, nurses must first apply to the nursing regulatory body of the province or territory where they wish to work:
In general, in order to be eligible to register as an RN or LPN, an applicant will need to demonstrate competency to practice. To demonstrate this, an applicant will need to have their education credentials assessed. Once education credentials are deemed equivalent to nursing education programs in Canada, the nursing regulatory body will then address whether other application requirements are met. Additional application requirements generally include criteria such as work experience, good character, language proficiency, screening for criminal history and registration in the jurisdiction where the applicant currently practices.
Once a positive assessment of the application requirements has been met, Canadian provinces and territories, with the exception of Quebec, require that nurses write the Canadian Registered Nurse Examination (CRNE) or Canadian Practical Nurse Registration Exam (CPNRE) as part of the registration or licensure process (the province of Quebec maintains its own registration examination). At present, these exams can only be written in Canada. Once an applicant has successfully completed the required examination, the applicant may be eligible to work as a nurse in Canada.
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As Canadian Industries Boom, Civil Engineers in High Demand

English: Al Bordeau Reviewing Plansets. Is thi...

English: Al Bordeau Reviewing Plansets. Is this a plan of utilities like water supply, electricity, etc in a urban district (MUD District Tract = Municipal Utility District)? which? what device is lying there? (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

English: Al Bordeau Reviewing Plansets. Is this a plan of utilities like water supply, electricity, etc in a urban district (MUD District Tract = Municipal Utility District)? which? what device is lying there? (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

By David Cohen

All around the world, civil engineers are among the key drivers of economic and societal growth. In Canada, a country with a rapidly expanding economy, the need for skilled engineers has never been greater. Civil engineers who come to Canada are able to take advantage of one of the most welcoming and well-paying job markets in the world, and many are able to stay in Canada permanently as Canadian Permanent Residents.
The Need for Civil Engineers
Civil engineering is one of the largest branches of engineering, comprising approximately one fifth of the entire discipline. Despite its popularity, Canada is facing a drastic shortage of qualified civil engineers. This is due to a number of factors, including expansion of projects throughout the country and a work force that is, on average, older and closer to retirement than other engineering disciplines.
While civil engineers are coveted across Canada, the provinces of British Columbia and Alberta are especially in need of experts in this field. According to Statistics Canada, 2013 was the first year that the ‘excess supply’ of civil engineers in the country reached zero. This means that, statistically, the profession has full employment. At current rates, it is expected that thousands of civil engineering jobs will need to be filled by the year 2020.
With too few Canadian graduates pursuing this career path, many employers are looking abroad to find the workers they need. Shawn Paulson, an Edmonton-based engineering recruiter, said the following in an interview with the Financial Post:
“We’ve shown a 25% increase in overall hires each year, and those are all engineers. Last year alone we hired over 600 engineering-related professionals. Unfortunately, there are just not enough graduates right now.”
Civil Engineers Find Success in Canada
Once in Canada, civil engineers benefit from good jobs and competitive salaries. Because their skills are in high demand, they have the flexibility to work almost anywhere they wish, provided that they obtain the necessary certification.
Even recent civil engineering graduates with limited professional experience are highly sought after. In fact, the entry level salary for this field is one of the highest in Canada, with new graduates regularly making figures in the mid $60,000 range. Mid-career and advanced level professionals can make salaries in the hundreds of thousands of dollars.
With so much demand for their skills, civil engineers can choose not just their place of work, but also the type of work they wish to do. They are therefore often able to work on fulfilling assignments in fields directly associated with their expertise, whether they are in a booming city or on the Canadian frontier.
“With a growing population in need of services, not to mention the incredibly profitable natural resources sector, engineers are needed more than ever to help Canada meet current and future needs,” said Attorney David Cohen. “More than almost any other occupation, their skills are truly rewarded at the highest levels.”
Coming to Canada as a Civil Engineer
At any time, a foreign engineer may travel to Canada as a Temporary Worker, provided they have received an eligible job offer and obtained the necessary work authorization. However, there are also many options for civil engineers to immigrate directly to Canada as Permanent Residents.
The Quebec Skilled Worker Program awards a high number of points to civil engineers, whose profession is currently listed on the province’s list of eligible areas of training/fields of study. Once in Canada, engineers who immigrate through this program may seek work in Quebec’s cities or extensive natural resource sector, or they may pursue employment opportunities elsewhere in Canada.
Additionally, Civil Engineers are on the current list of eligible occupations for the popular Federal Skilled Worker Program. The Federal Skilled Worker Program is accepting only 300 applications for each targeted occupation, so interested applicants should be aware that quick action may be required to submit an application before the program closes for this year.
If an individual is already working in Canada as a civil engineer, s/he may be eligible to apply through the Skilled Worker stream of the Provincial Nominee Program that covers their province of residence, or through the Canadian or Quebec Experience Class programs.
“Overall, there is no shortage of opportunities for a civil engineer to come to Canada,” said Attorney David Cohen. “With such valuable skills, they will truly have all of Canada ready to welcome them to their new home.”
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Career Resources for Newcomer Doctors and Surgeons (International Medical Graduates)

 

International Medical Graduates Doctors (IMG's)
International Medical Graduates Doctors (IMG’s) (Photo credit: DIAC Images)
It’s a difficult time right now for immigrants to Canada who are doctors and surgeons, and who want to work here in the profession they followed back home.
Many parts of Canada are going through a dangerous doctor shortage. And yet, if you’re an International Medical Graduate (IMG), you may be frustrated by how long it could take you, and what you’ll need to go through, before you’re permitted to practice medicine in Canada. Many newcomer IMGs are making their feelings about the situation known on the Internet, expressing their disgust, their disappointment, and their sense of having been betrayed by Canada.
One thing we’ve always believed here at Canadian Newcomer is that even though the system is flawed, it won’t get any better if people don’t change it; and if nothing can be done to change it yet, then we’ll try our best to help you cope with it. This article – really a directory – provides links to resources for IMGs in every Province and Territory. You’ll be able to get an idea of what’s required for you to be able to practice medicine in the area you’ve moved to, or the one you want to live in. And you’ll find out what resources are available to help you get back to practicing your calling – and helping people get well.

All of Canada:

The Canadian Information Centre for International Credentials has information for InternationalMedical Doctors (IMDs), more often called International Medical Graduates (IMGs) who wish to practice medicine in Canada.
The Canadian Medical Placement Service provides important information for IMGs who want to immigrate to Canada and practice medicine here.
The CanadaQBank website has information and links for IMGs about how to become licensed to practice medicine in the various provinces in Canada.
lulu.com Books to Help you study for the MCCEE – including some free ones!
The Canadian Resident Matching Service (CaRMS) is a non-profit organization that helps doctors find residencies.

Ontario:

The Ontario Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care website has information for International Medical Doctors (International Medical Graduates) about training and assessment positions and how to apply for them.
The Centre for the Evaluation of Health Professionals Educated Abroad provides assessment, evaluation and training programs for internationally educated health professionals in Ontario.
Career Transitions for International Medical Doctors features the Medical License Bridging Program (MLBP) for International Medical Doctors, including regional portals for information about the Career Transitions Program in Ottawa, Hamilton and Toronto.
HealthForceOntario is a marketing and recruitment agency that can help you through the process of becoming licensed to practice medicine in Ontario.
The Medical License Bridging Program for International Medical Doctors is a central resource for International Medical Doctors who are working towards becoming licensed to practice medicine in Canada.
The College of Physicians and Surgeons of Ontario regulates the practice of medicine in the province, and is developing a website to provide web-based medical literacy and educational told to help with the communication needs of IMGs wishing to practice medicine in Ontario.
Working in Ontario has a webpage for physicians and surgeons with information about programs for International Medical Doctors

British Columbia:

The University of British Columbia offers the IMG-BC Program, funded by BC’s Ministry of Health, enables International Medical Doctors to compete for and obtain residency positions that will lead to being licensed to practice medicine in BC.
The Association of International Medical Doctors of British Columbia works to improve possibilities for becoming certified to practice medicine in Canada, and has links to training and upgrading opportunities.
The College of Physicians and Surgeons of British Columbia is the governing body for the profession in the Province.
The BC Physician Integration Program provides International Medical Graduates on the College of Physicians and Surgeons of BC’s Provisional Register with a comprehensive orientation and introduction to the British Columbia health care system.

Alberta:

The Alberta International Medical Graduate Program is an assessment and placement program for International Medical Doctors in Alberta, funded by the Alberta Government.
The Alberta International Medical Graduates Association provides IMGs with advocacy, awareness, and support.
The College of Physicians and Surgeons of Alberta has programs to help IMGs obtain necessary training and residency to practice medicine in Alberta.
Alberta Physician Link has information for International Medical Doctors wishing to practice in Alberta, and a page about employment opportunities for spouses of IMGs.
The Government of Alberta has information and flowcharts for the steps IMGs must take to become licensed to practice medicine in Alberta.
The Directions for Immigrants website has a wealth of information about qualifying to practice medicine in Alberta, including links to training and service programs for IMGs.

Saskatchewan:

The University of Saskatchewan provides resources for International Medical Doctors, including videos on many relevant topics.
The Saskatchewan Immigration Canada website offers information for IMGs on the steps that must be taken to become licensed as a physician in Saskatchewan.
The Saskatchewan Medical Association can help connect you with the information and programs you need to practice medicine in Saskatchewan.
The College of Physicians and Surgeons of Saskatchewan is the regulatory body for the profession in Saskatchewan. The College is developing a new Saskatchewan-based assessment process for IMGs, and has other useful information to help IMGs.
The Saskatchewan International Medical Graduates Association exists to help IMGs on the path to practicing medicine in Saskatchewan.
The Government of Saskatchewan provides an International Physician Practice Assessment (SIPPA), a process for assessing IMGs’ readiness to practice in Saskatchewan.

Manitoba:

The Government of Manitoba has a Medical Licensure Program for International Medical Graduates (MLPIMG), to assist them to obtain license to practice as primary care physicians in Manitoba; and a Resource Guide for IMGs.
The University of Manitoba offers an International Medical Graduate Program that features assessment, training, and orientation for IMGs wishing to practice medicine in Manitoba.
The Assiniboine Regional Health Authority has information on physician recruitment for IMGs in Manitoba.
The College of Physicians and Surgeons of Manitoba is the regulatory body of the profession in the province, and has information about the Medical Licensure Program for International Medical Graduates.

Québec:

The Fédération des médecins residents du Québec provides information for IMGs wishing to practice medicine in Québec.
The Collège des médecins du Québec is responsible for evaluating the credentials and training of IMGs wishing to practice in the Province.
Recruitment Santé Québec is a department of the Ministère de la Santé et des Services sociaux du Québec, with special programs for IMGs.
McGill University has a webpage about non-Ministry funded residency positions, including those for IMGs.

New Brunswick:

Dalhousie University in Halifax, Nova Scotia, has a residency program for New Brunswick IMGs educated at medical schools medical school on the Foundation for Advancement of International Medical Education and Research (FAIMER) list.
The College of Physicians and Surgeons of New Brunswick is the governing body for the profession in the province, which sometimes grants provisional licenses to IMGs.

Nova Scotia:

Clinician Assessment for Practice Program (CAPP) is intended for IMG physicians who believe they are practice entry for entry into family practice without any additional formal residency training in Canada.
Dalhousie University in Halifax, Nova Scotia, has a residency program for IMGs educated at medical schools medical school on the Foundation for Advancement of International Medical Education and Research (FAIMER) list.
Health Team Nova Scotia includes a webpage detailing steps for IMGs wishing to practice medicine in the Province.
Doctors Nova Scotia provides helpful links and resources for IMGs who want to practice in Nova Scotia.
Atlantic Connection for Internationally Educated Health Professionals has valuable information about licensure and other aspects of practicing medicine in Nova Scotia.
The College of Physicians and Surgeons of Nova Scotia is the governing body for the profession in the Province.
Healthcare Atlantic Canada has answers to frequently asked questions about medical licensure in Nova Scotia.

Newfoundland and Labrador:

The College of Physicians and Surgeons of Newfoundland and Labrador is the governing body for the profession in the province, and has information for IMGs wishing to practice.
PracticeNL has a guide for IMGs wishing to practice medicine in Newfoundland and Labrador, either having immigrated or on a work permit.

Prince Edward Island:

Dalhousie University in Halifax, Nova Scotia, has a residency program for Prince Edward Island IMGs educated at medical schools medical school on the Foundation for Advancement of International Medical Education and Research (FAIMER) list.
The Medical Society of Prince Edward Island is a professional body, a provincial division of the Canadian Medical Association.
Health Jobs PEI has a special section for IMGs wishing to practice medicine in Prince Edward Island.

Nunavut:

The Government of Nunavut has a Physician Recruitment website with information on practicing medicine in the Territory.

Northwest Territories:

The Government of the Northwest Territories Department of Health and Social Services provides information for IMGs wishing to practice medicine in the NWT.

Yukon:

The Yukon Medical Council is the governing body of the profession in the Territory, and includes requirements for IMGs to practice medicine in the Territory in its FAQ section.
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Career Resources for Newcomer Architects

Once setting the free standing, land record fo...

Once setting the free standing, land record for the world’s tallest structure, measuring 553.33 meters (1,815 feet, 5 inches), the CN Tower is Toronto’s most visible landmark and arguably its most celebrated tourist destination. 2006 marks its 30th anniversary. This view looks WNW. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Once setting the free standing, land record for the world’s tallest structure, measuring 553.33 meters (1,815 feet, 5 inches), the CN Tower is Toronto’s most visible landmark and arguably its most celebrated tourist destination. 2006 marks its 30th anniversary. This view looks WNW. (Photo credit:Wikipedia)
Becoming an architect takes years of training and hard work. If you’re a newcomer architect, you’ll need resources to help you get back to work in your field in Canada. We hope these will help you continue to work and advance your career.

All of Canada:

 
Architecture Canada | Royal Architectural Institute of Canada(RAIC)
– Canada’s architectural regulatory body
Government of Canada – Foreign Credentials Referral Office
– links and information for internationally educated architects
Service Canada – Architect
– labour market and requirements information for internationally educated architects wishing to work in Canada
Canadian Information Centre for International Credentials (CICIC)
– Essential information for internationally educated architects wishing to practice their profession in Canada
Article: Internationally Educated Architect Job Find program enhanced
– 26 September 2012 article about recent launch of Federal program to help internationally educated architects find jobs in Canada
Canadian Architectural Certification Board
– information for internationally educated architects, from the regulatory body of architecture in Canada
Canadian Architect Magazine
– publication for architects in Canada, including internationally-trained architects

Ontario:

 
Ontario Association of Architects
– information and programs for newcomer architects in Ontario
Ontario Immigration
– Career Map for newcomer architects in Canada
JVS Toronto
– Bridge training program for internationally educated architects

British Columbia:

 
WelcomeBC
– information on labour market, qualifications, and job-hunting for architects who are new to Canada
Architectural Institute of British Columbia
– information on practicing as an architect in British Columbia
BC Internationally Trained Professionals Network 
– a partnership of internationally trained professionals from around the province, working cooperatively, to improve access to meaningful employment for all immigrant professionals in BC

Alberta:

 
Alberta Association of Architects
– information for internationally educated architects, from the licensing body of architects in Alberta
Directions for Immigrants – Architecture
– information on how internationally educated architects who want to continue their careers in Alberta

Saskatchewan:

 
SaskImmigration
– Career map for internationally educated architects who want to work in Saskatchewan
Saskatchewan Association of Architects
– information from the licensing body of architects in Saskatchewan

Manitoba:

 
Immigrate to Manitoba
– information on how internationally educated architects can get licensed to practice in Manitoba
Manitoba Association of Architects
– resources from the professional association of architects in Manitoba

Québec:

 
Ordre des architectes du Québec (OAQ)
– L’Ordre des architectes du Québec (OAQ) contrôle l’accès à la profession d’architecte et en réglemente l’exercice dans la province.

New Brunswick:

 
WelcomeNB
– fact sheet for internationally educated architects wishing to continue their careers in New Brunswick
Architects Association of New Brunswick
– information from the licensing body for architects in the province of New Brunswick

Prince Edward Island:

 
Architects Association of Prince Edward Island
– information from the licensing body for architects in the province of PEI

Nova Scotia:

 
Nova Scotia Association of Architects
– information from the licensing body for architects in the province of Nova Scotia

Newfoundland and Labrador:

 
Architects Licensing Board of Newfoundland and Labrador
– information from the licensing body for architects in the province of Newfoundland and Labrador
Newfoundland and Labrador Association of Architects
– the professional association for architects in Newfoundland and Labrador

Nunavut:

 
Canadian Institute for Recognizing Learning
– information on how to work as an architect in Nunavut, which has no governing body for the profession

Northwest Territories:

 
Northwest Territories Association of Architects
– information on working in the profession, from the licensing body for architects in Northwest Territories

Yukon:

 
Canadian Institute for Recognizing Learning
– information on how to work as an architect in Yukon, which has no governing body for the profession

 

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Career Resources for Newcomer Skilled Tradespersons

English: La Cité collégiale, Ottawa, Ontario, ...

English: La Cité collégiale, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada, photographed from the air on 12 October 2008 (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

English: La Cité collégiale, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada, photographed from the air on 12 October 2008 (Photo credit:Wikipedia)
Skilled tradespeople are in demand in Canada. If you were employed in a trade in your country of origin and want to get back to it in Canada, you’ll need resources. So we’ve put together some links for Internationally Educated Skilled Tradespersons, so you can find bridge training, credential recognition, and other resources for getting you back to your skilled trade as fast as possible. We hope these will help you in your new life in Canada.
All of Canada:
Tradeability.ca
– lots of links to resources for skilled tradespersons
Canadian Information Centre for International Credentials (CICIC)
– links for internationally trained tradespeople in every province of Canada
Red Seal Program
– recognized as the interprovincial standard of excellence in the skilled trades
ApprenticeTrades.ca
– information on working in the skilled trades in different parts of Canada
New West Partnership Trade Agreement
– Links to regulatory bodies for skilled trades in British Columbia, Alberta and Saskatchewan
Internationally Trained Workers – Foreign Credential Recognition
– links to international credential recognition agencies across the country
Internationally Trained Workers – Resources by Province
– links to resources for internationally trained skilled tradespersons in all provinces and territories
Citizenship and Immigration Canada – Skilled Workers
– how to immigrate to Canada as a skilled worker
Careers in Oil and Gas
– information and links for skilled tradespersons wishing to work in Canada’s oil and gas industry
Explore for More – Careers in Mining
– resources for skilled tradespeople wishing to develop a mining career in Canada
Government of Canada – Foreign Credentials Referral Office
– provides information, path-finding and referral services on foreign credential recognition for internationally trained workers
Ontario:
Government of Ontario – Trades in Ontario site
– information and links for skilled tradespersons new to Canada
Government of Ontario – Ontario Bridge Training site
– information about bridge training for skilled tradespeople new in Canada
Internationally Trained Workers site
– information for internationally trained workers in the construction industry
La Cité collégiale
– offers skills bridging for francophone internationally-trained construction tradespeople
YMCA/YWCA National Capital Region – Power of Trades
– pre-employment bridging program for internationally trained tradespeople
Conestoga College Pathways into Trades & Apprenticeship
– offers opportunities for internationally trained tradespersons to challenge the qualification exams
The Ontario College of Trades
– This is the regulatory body for skilled trades in Ontario. They have important information for internationally trained skilled tradespeople wishing to work in Ontario.
Skills for Change
– offers 11-week programs for internationally trained HVAC mechanics, plumbers, millwrights, carpenters, construction/maintenance electricians and industrial electricians
British Columbia:
Industry Training Authority, British Columbia
– Oportunities for immigrants and internationally trained tradespeople
Skills Connect at Douglas College
– program of job placement and skills upgrading
Skilled Trades Employment Program (STEP)
– employment programs for internationally trained skilled workers in over 90 recognized skilled trades
Alberta:
Working in Alberta
– guide for internationally trained newcomers who wish to work in Alberta
Government of Alberta – Apprenticeship and Industry Training
– important information for IESTs in Alberta
Government of Alberta
– information for internationally trained skilled tradespersons planning to work in Alberta
Saskatchewan:
Saskatchewan Apprenticeship and Grade Certification Commission
– important information for skilled tradespersons who want to work in Saskatchewan
SaskImmigration
– process map for internationally-trained skilled tradespeople wishing to work in Saskatchewan
IMMSkills program
– skills assessment for internationally trained tradespeople who want to work in Saskatchewan
Manitoba:
Government of Manitoba – Trades Qualification
– IESTs can challenge the exams to qualify in their trades without additional training
Red River College – ESL for Trades
– English as a Second Language for internationally-trained tradespeople
Success Skills Centre
– helps internationally trained tradespeople become certified and employed in their trade in Manitoba
Workplace Integration of Skilled Newcomers in Trades (WISNIT)
– helps internationally trained tradespeople become certified and employed in their trade
Québec:
Guide de la qualification professionnelle
– information on regulated trades in Québec (in French/ en français)
Emploi Québec
– information sur le marché de travail/ information on the labour market (in French and English/ en français et anglais)
New Brunswick:
Government of New Brunswick – Mobility/ Recognition of Credentials
– steps to take when you want to work in New Brunswick
Prince Edward Island:
Government of Prince Edward Island
– information on apprenticeship, training and certification for skilled tradespeople in PEI
Government of Prince Edward Island – PNP International Graduates
– Provincial Nominee Program – information about the PEI PNP for internationally trained tradespeople
PEI Association for Newcomers to Canada
– programs for newcomer skilled tradespersons – certifications, training, international qualification recognition
Nova Scotia:
Government of Nova Scotia
– information for newcomer skilled tradespeople who wish to continue their careers in Nova Scotia
Hants County, Nova Scotia
– links to resources for newcomers wishing to live and work in Nova Scotia
Newfoundland and Labrador:
Association for New Canadians – Employment Services
– services and resources for internationally trained tradespeople wishing to work in Newfoundland and Labrador
Career Information Resource Centre/ Employment Outreach Services
– information and links for those wishing to work in Newfoundland and Labrador
Immigrate to Newfoundland and Labrador
– information and links for getting your credentials recognized in Newfoundland and Labrador
Nunavut:
Arctic College – PLAR Program
– information on the college’s Prior Learning Assessment and Recognition program for internationally trained newcomers who wish to work in Canada. They also have Skilled Trades Training Programs
Northwest Territories:
Northwest Territories Provincial Nominee Program
– information on the territory’s PNP program and how it can benefit internationally trained skilled tradespeople wising to work in NWT.
Career and Employment Development Division – Career Resources
– links to information for job-seekers in Northwest Territories
Yukon:
Government of Yukon – Apprenticeship and Trades Qualification
– information about qualifying to work in the skilled trades in Yukon
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Pilot Project to Attract More Working Families to B.C.

Image via Wikipedia

ICTORIA, BRITISH COLUMBIA–(Marketwire – Aug. 12, 2011) – Family members of most temporary foreign workers in British Columbia will be able to work for any employer in the province, thanks to a pilot project launched today.
The announcement was made by Citizenship, Immigration and Multiculturalism Minister Jason Kenney and British Columbia Minister of Jobs, Tourism and Innovation Pat Bell.
“Since I became Minister, I have heard from workers, employers, labour advocates and others who have asked me to make Canada more welcoming for working families coming to Canada as temporary residents,” said Minister Kenney. “With this pilot project, we will examine the benefits of allowing family members of temporary foreign workers to work while they are here with a principal applicant who has been hired because of his or her skills.”
In general, temporary foreign workers come to Canada to meet the needs of a specific employer who has been unable to find citizens or permanent residents for the available jobs. An open work permit, however, allows the holder to accept any job with any employer.
Previously, only spouses and common-law partners of temporary foreign workers employed in a managerial, professional or skilled trades job have been eligible to obtain an open work permit in British Columbia. Starting August 15, spouses, common-law partners and working-age dependants of most temporary foreign workers will be eligible, including many workers in occupations that require lower levels of formal training.
“More than a million jobs will open up in B.C. by 2020, and we will need foreign workers to help meet the skills shortages our businesses are already beginning to face,” said Minister Bell. “Giving more spouses and working-aged children of temporary foreign workers the chance to take jobs will support local businesses, while contributing to local, regional and provincial economic growth.”
Up to 1,800 open work permits will be available under the pilot project, which will end on February 15, 2013.
“Nearly 32,000 temporary foreign workers made the transition to permanent status in 2010, and of those, almost 2,300 chose to immigrate permanently to BC,” Minister Kenney noted. “We understand the important role that foreign workers have in every region of the country and we will continue to look at ways to attract workers who have the skills we need now and into the future.”
British Columbia’s shared role in immigration was cemented in April 2010 with the signing of the Canada-British Columbia Immigration Agreement.
Connect with the Province of B.C. at www.gov.bc.ca/connect.

Be emotionally prepared – Newcomers to Canada offer move-in advice: RBC poll

Entrance of Mount Robson Provincial Park, Brit...Image via Wikipedia

TORONTOJuly 13, 2011 /PRNewswire/ – The best advice newcomers to Canada have for anyone looking to follow in their footsteps is to be mentally prepared, including being ready for any sacrifices involved in settling in this country, according to an RBC poll.
More than half (58 per cent) say mental preparation is key, with almost a third (30 per cent) noting that sacrifices or tradeoffs may need to be made and 28 per cent saying being positive and patient will help achieve long-term results.
“Moving to a new country is a life-changing decision and being mentally prepared for the challenges of a different culture can really help ensure a successful move,” said Camon Mak, director, Multicultural Markets, RBC. “Many newcomers focus on the physical and financial changes that come with a move, but establishing a support network and connecting with the community can be just as important.”
According to the RBC poll, 47 per cent conducted online research to understand more about life in Canada, while more than half (54 per cent) said they prepared themselves for the social aspects of moving to Canada before they came to this country, by:
  • Informing relatives/friends already in Canada of their intentions to come here so relatives/friends could provide help and advice (33 per cent)
  • Refreshing their language skills (33 per cent)
“There are a number of ways RBC helps potential immigrants prepare before moving. For example, our Beijing branch offers advice on life in Canada and what to expect on arrival, assists in setting up a bank account and whenever possible, introduces clients to local branch staff,” added Mak. “Through our website, anyone around the globe can be connected to someone at RBC who speaks their language, as we now offer banking assistance in over 180 languages.”
Established newcomers also noted that success in Canada is not just measured in financial or career terms. Almost half (46 per cent) of newcomers who have already settled in Canada define success based on “mind/spirit”, including inner peace and strength, enjoying small daily events of life, and love. In fact, female newcomers were more likely than male newcomers to use mind/spirit measurements (54 per cent compared to 39 per cent), while male newcomers were more likely than female newcomers to define success based on their career (57 per cent compared to 47 per cent).
About the Environics Poll
The findings were conducted by Environics Research Group on behalf of RBC in April 2011. Environics conducted a total of 608 interviews among Chinese and South Asian immigrant residents in British Columbia and Ontario who are first generation and have lived in Canada for 10 years or less. Interviews were conducted online and respondents were recruited from an online consumer research panel. Quotas were applied to represent the different regions and tenure in Canada. Data was weighted according to population data from 2006 Census to represent the population as closely as possible. A survey with an unweighted probability sample of this size and a 100 per cent response rate would have an estimated margin of error of ±4 percentage points 19 times out of 20 of what the results would have been had the entire population of Chinese and South immigrants in Canada been polled. All sample surveys and polls may be subject to other sources of error, including, but not limited to, coverage error and measurement error.
About RBC Welcome to Canada Package
For more than seven generations, RBC has been supporting newcomers by providing them with resources and tools that make the transition to a new country seamless. The RBC Welcome to Canada package helps newcomers who have been inCanada for less than three years with key financial decisions and includes advice and discounts on products and services. Details on The RBC Welcome to Canada banking package can be found at www.rbc.com/settlequick. Consumers around the world can access information on moving to Canada, including financial advice checklists and more, at www.rbc.com/canada. From 2005 to 2009, 14 per cent of all immigrants were Chinese (including those from Hong Kong and Taiwan) and 18 per cent were South Asian (from IndiaPakistanBangladesh and Sri Lanka). These two groups represent one-third of recent (past five years) newcomers and are the largest sources of immigration in this time period.
Videos:

Board of Trade workplace program connects immigrants and Burnaby businesses

MetrotownImage via WikipediaBY JANAYA FULLER-EVANS, BURNABY NOW



The Burnaby Board of Trade is working to break down barriers to employment for new residents.
The board has conducted six Breaking Down the Barriers workplace tours and is hosting its final forum for the project on April 28.
The aim of the project was to connect more than 250 immigrants with Canadian companies over a period of 18 months.
The project was designed to create meaningful dialogue between immigrants and employers, allowing attendees to exchange experiences and share perspectives.
The project has helped immigrants and employers better understand the challenges each faces, according to Darlene Gering, president and CEO of the board.
“Employers are saying, we do have to look at our hiring practices,” she said.
And immigrants get an idea of what businesses are looking for, Gering added.
For instance, one of the common threads on the tours was that immigrants looking for work didn’t realize employers do the majority of hiring through networking or employee recommendations, she explained.
“It was quite new for immigrants to learn that,” Gering said, adding this surprised her, as people on the tours have gone through employment training with social service agencies.
Another interesting challenge for immigrants was understanding the different types of workplace culture in Canada, as they often expect to have to adapt to one cultural standard, she said.
But in fact, workplace culture varies depending on the industry and the type of company, Gering explained.
Gering addressed some of the challenges immigrants face in finding employment at a recent tour..
“The Canadian employment market is significantly more robust than others, but accessing it can be difficult and daunting for immigrants for whom language and cultural difference pose an inhibitory barrier to entry,” she said.
“However, we need more immigrants to drive innovation, which is fundamental to our economy’s success. We must continue to position British Columbia as the preferred destination for the world’s best and brightest – therefore Canadian companies need to understand the challenges immigrants face in accessing the employment market. Additionally, immigrants need to be given the tools to market themselves so they are more appealing to employers.”
Gering added that she is proud of the board’s partnership with the Burnaby Intercultural Planning Table, which is leading the initiative.
The final tour was on April 14.
The board has been conducting the tours over the past 18 months, to introduce new immigrants to businesses in Burnaby. Tours have included the healthcare industry, engineering, finance, the IT and technology sector, green businesses, and accounting.
The forums are intended to raise awareness and reach out to the business community regarding the importance of newcomer integration into society, particularly through employment opportunities.
They are designed for immigrant job seekers, industry professionals and hiring managers.
The final forum, which is free to employers, is on April 28 from 5:30 to 8:30 p.m. at the Vancouver Hilton Metrotown.
Bob Elton, chair of the Immigrant Employment Council of British Columbia and former president and CEO of B.C. Hydro, is presenting.
The Government of Canada and the Province of British Columbia have provided funding for the Breaking Down the Barriers project.
For more information, go to: http://www.bbot.ca.

Read more: http://www.burnabynow.com/Business+leaders+building+bridges+breaking+barriers/4682677/story.html#ixzz1KlceyRTb

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