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Information for foreign-trained cardiology technologists

English: ROCAFUERTE, Ecuador (May 16, 2011) Lt...

English: ROCAFUERTE, Ecuador (May 16, 2011) Lt. Cmdr. Brad Serwer, a cardiologist from Olney, Md., listens to a patient’s lungs at the Escuela Don Bosco medical site during Continuing Promise 2011. Continuing Promise is a five-month humanitarian assistance mission to the Caribbean, Central and South America. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Kasey Close/Released) (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

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Information on requirements to practise

The occupation of cardiology technologist is not regulated in Canada except in New Brunswick, where technologists are required to be registered with the New Brunswick Society of Cardiology Technologists. To practise in Canada, it is preferable for cardiology technologists to be registered with the Canadian Society of Cardiology Technologists (CSCT).

Affiliated with the Canadian Cardiovascular Society (CCS), the CSCT is the self-governing body that sets the standards for the profession and administers the examination and certification process for membership in the society. You may consult their CSCT Hand Guide about examination policies and procedures.

Information on assessment of qualifications

Foreign-trained cardiology technologists may contact the CSCT for an evaluation of their qualifications prior to arrival in Canada.

 

You should note that if you are already licensed to practise your occupation in a province or territory of Canada, and later wish to work in a non-regulated occupation, employers may request that you provide them with a formal assessment of your academic credentials.

If that is the case, or if you wish to have your credentials assessed for a purpose other than practising a regulated occupation in Canada, you may consult our Fact Sheet No. 2, “Assessment and recognition of credentials for the purpose of employment in Canada” and contact an academic credential evaluation service. Although evaluation services offer expert advice on how qualifications obtained abroad compare with academic credentials obtained in Canada, their evaluations are advisory only and do not guarantee recognition of your qualifications for employment or certification purposes in Canada. Please note that evaluation services charge a fee for their assessments.

 

 

Information on assessment for immigration purposes, under the Federal Skilled Worker Program (FSWP)

The Federal Skilled Worker Program (FSWP) is an immigration program administered by Citizenship and Immigration Canada (CIC), the department responsible for immigration to Canada.

CIC has listed this profession (NOC 3217) as an eligible occupation under the FSWP. To apply for immigration to Canada under this program, one of the requirements* is to obtain an “Educational Credential Assessment” (ECA) for immigration purposes from a CIC-designated organization. We invite you to communicate directly with one of the designated organizations to begin this process from outside Canada.

*It is important to note that this requirement is for immigration purposes only. It is separate from the process to obtain a license to practice from the relevant regulatory body listed below. Obtaining a license to practice is not required to apply for immigration.

Other relevant information

For a general description of duties and employment requirements, you can refer to the information prepared by Human Resources and Skills Development Canada regarding:

Specific Provincial/Territorial Information

 

You may also be interested in the CICIC information pages for:

 

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Information for foreign-trained medical radiation technologists

English: A map of Canada exhibiting its ten pr...

English: A map of Canada exhibiting its ten provinces and three territories, and their capitals. (Lambert conformal conic projection from The Atlas of Canada) (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

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Information on requirements to practise

The profession of medical radiation technologist is regulated in Alberta, New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, Ontario, Quebec, and Saskatchewan. In these provinces, you must be registered with the provincial regulatory body to practise and to use the designation assigned by that regulatory body. Therefore, once you know where you will settle and work in Canada, you should contact the appropriate regulatory body (see list below) for details on registration procedures.

In all other provinces and territories, the profession is not regulated; however, most employers will require proof of successful completion of the national certification exam, administered by the Canadian Association of Medical Radiation Technologists (CAMRT), and proof of registration with the provincial professional association.

Information on assessment of qualifications

Foreign- trained medical radiation technologists must have their credentials assessed to establish their eligibility to write the CAMRT certification exam.

Alberta, Ontario and Quebec assess the credentials for international applicants who wish to work in their province. CAMRT performs the assessment of credentials on behalf of all other provinces. Please note that there is a fee for this assessment.

Review CAMRT’s information for international applicants or contact them at:

 

Canadian Association of Medical Radiation Technologists (CAMRT)
85 Albert Street, Suite 1000
Ottawa ON   K1P 6A4   Canada
Phone : 613-234-0012
Phone (alternate): 1-800-463-9729
Fax : 613-234-1097
Email : info@camrt.ca
http://www.camrt.ca/ 

 

 

You should note that if you are already licensed to practise your occupation in a province or territory of Canada, and later wish to work in a non-regulated occupation, employers may request that you provide them with a formal assessment of your academic credentials.

If that is the case, or if you wish to have your credentials assessed for a purpose other than practising a regulated occupation in Canada, you may consult our Fact Sheet No. 2, “Assessment and recognition of credentials for the purpose of employment in Canada” and contact an academic credential evaluation service. Although evaluation services offer expert advice on how qualifications obtained abroad compare with academic credentials obtained in Canada, their evaluations are advisory only and do not guarantee recognition of your qualifications for employment or certification purposes in Canada. Please note that evaluation services charge a fee for their assessments.

 

 

Information on assessment for immigration purposes, under the Federal Skilled Worker Program (FSWP)

The Federal Skilled Worker Program (FSWP) is an immigration program administered by Citizenship and Immigration Canada (CIC), the department responsible for immigration to Canada.

CIC has listed this profession (NOC 3215) as an eligible occupation under the FSWP. To apply for immigration to Canada under this program, one of the requirements* is to obtain an “Educational Credential Assessment” (ECA) for immigration purposes from a CIC-designated organization. We invite you to communicate directly with one of the designated organizations to begin this process from outside Canada.

*It is important to note that this requirement is for immigration purposes only. It is separate from the process to obtain a license to practice from the relevant regulatory body listed below. Obtaining a license to practice is not required to apply for immigration.

Specific Provincial/Territorial Information

Other relevant information

National Occupational Classification (NOC) Profile for Medical Radiation Technologists


flechevertehaut.gif List of provincial and territorial regulatory bodies

 

Alberta

Alberta College of Medical Diagnostic & Therapeutic Technologists (ACMDTT)
800, 4445 Calgary Trail
Edmonton AB   T6H 5R7   Canada
Phone : 780-487-6130
Phone (alternate): 1-800-282-2165
Fax : 780-432-9106
Email : info@acmdtt.com
http://www.acmdtt.com/ 

New Brunswick

New Brunswick Association of Medical Radiation Technologists (NBAMRT)
Memramcook Institute, Suite 129
488 rue Centrale
Memramcook NB   E4K 3S6    Canada
Phone : 506-758-0302
Phone (alternate): 1-800-268-2511
Email : registrar@nbamrt.ca
http://www.nbamrt.ca/ 

Nova Scotia

Nova Scotia Association of Medical Radiation Technologists (NSAMRT)
P.O. Box 9410, Station A
Halifax NS   B3K 5S3   Canada
Phone : 902-434-6525
Phone (alternate): 1-866-788-6525
Fax : 902-425-2441
Email : info@nsamrt.ca
http://nsamrt.ca/ 

Ontario

College of Medical Radiation Technologists of Ontario (CMRTO)
375 University Avenue, Suite 300
Toronto ON   M5G 2J5   Canada
Phone : 416-975-4353
Phone (alternate): 1-800-563-5847
Fax : 416-975-4355
Email : info@cmrto.org
http://www.cmrto.org/ 

Quebec

Ordre des technologues en radiologie du Québec (OTRQ)
6455 rue Jean-Talon Est
Bureau 401
Montréal QC   H1S 3E8   Canada
Phone : 514-351-0052
Phone (alternate): 1-800-361-8759
Fax : 514-355-2396
Email : info@otimro.qc.ca
http://www.otrq.qc.ca/ 

Saskatchewan

Saskatchewan Association of Medical Radiation Technologists (SAMRT)
218 – 408 Broad Street
Regina SK   S4R 1X3   Canada
Phone : 306-525-9678
Fax : 306-525-9680
Email : samrtofc@sasktel.net
http://samrt.org/ 

 

flechevertehaut.gif List of provincial and territorial professional associations

 

British Columbia

British Columbia Association of Medical Radiation Technologists (BCMRT)
102 – 211 Columbia Street
Vancouver BC   V6A 2R5   Canada
Phone : 604-682-8171
Phone (alternate): 1-800-990-7090
Fax : 604-681-4545
Email : office@bcamrt.bc.ca
http://www.bcamrt.bc.ca/ 

Manitoba

Manitoba Association of Medical Radiation Technologists (MAMRT)
202 – 819 Sargent Avenue
Winnipeg MB   R3E 0B9   Canada
Phone : 204-774-5346
Fax : 204-744-5346
Email : admin@mamrt.ca
http://www.mamrt.ca/ 

Newfoundland and Labrador

Newfoundland and Labrador Association of Medical Radiation Technologists (NLAMRT)
P.O. Box 29141, Torbay Road Post Office
St. John’s NL   A1A 5B5   Canada
Phone : 709-777-6036
Email : association@nlamrt.ca
http://www.nlamrt.ca/ 

Ontario

Ontario Association of Medical Radiation Technologists (OAMRS)
P.O. Box 1054
Brantford ON   N3T 5S7   Canada
Phone : 519-753-6037
Phone (alternate): 1-800-387-4674
Fax : 519-753-6408
Email : inquiries@oamrt.on.ca
http://www.oamrt.on.ca/ 

Prince Edward Island

Prince Edward Island Association of Medical Radiation Technologists (PEIAMRT)
61 Queen Elizabeth Dr.
Charlottetown PE   C1A 3A8   Canada
Email : peiamrtregistrar@bellaliant.net
http://www.peiamrt.ca/ 
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Information for foreign-trained civil engineers

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Information on requirements to practise

The engineering profession is regulated in Canada. It is illegal to practise as an engineer or to use the title “engineer” without being licensed as a professional engineer with a provincial or territorial association. However, individuals can do engineering work under the direct supervision of licensed professional engineers.

Provincial and territorial engineering regulatory bodies are responsible for setting the standards for entry into the profession and for issuing licences to those who meet established standards of qualifications and practice. Therefore, once you know where you will settle and work in Canada, you should contact the appropriate regulatory body for details on licensure procedures (See list below).

Engineers Canada established the Canadian Engineering Accreditation Board (CEAB) in 1965 to accredit undergraduate engineering programs at Canadian institutions which provide aspiring engineers with the academic requirements necessary for registration as a professional engineer in Canada. The list of accredited academic programs can be consulted on its web site, as well as the Engineers Canada Examination Syllabus.

Information on assessment of qualifications

 

The Roadmap to Engineering in Canada Web site is dedicated to providing information to international engineering graduates on the steps to obtain a licence to practise as a professional engineer in Canada. Roadmap to Engineering in Canada Web
For details, click here.

While not part of the registration process to become a licensed professional engineer in Canada, the Roadmap includes the on-line Academic Information Tool, which provides valuable information on how an undergraduate education in engineering obtained outside Canada compares to a Canadian undergraduate education in engineering.

This is important, as the definition of engineering varies from one country to the next. Work and training that in some countries are called engineering and are linked to the job title of engineer may fall into a different job category in Canada. The Academic Information Tool assists applicants in making an informed choice about immigrating to Canada.

Please note that the Academic Information Tool provides general information on how international academic credentials compare to those issued in Canada. It is not part of the formal immigration selection process, nor is it part of the engineering licensure process.

For more information, contact:

 

Engineers Canada
Foreign Credential Recognition Program
180 Elgin Street, Suite 1100
Ottawa ON   K2P 2K3   Canada
Phone : 613-232-2474
Phone (alternate): 1-877-408-9273
Fax : 613-230-5759
Email : newcomers@engineerscanada.ca
http://www.engineerscanada.ca/e/ 

 

For immigration to Quebec, you should contact the Ordre des ingénieurs du Québec (OIQ) directly:

 

Ordre des ingénieurs du Québec (OIQ)
Gare Windsor, bureau 350
1100, avenue des Canadiens-de-Montréal
Montréal QC   H3B 2S2   Canada
Phone : 514-845-6141
Phone (alternate): 1-800-461-6141
Fax : 514-845-1833
Email : info@oiq.qc.ca
http://www.oiq.qc.ca/ 

 

You should note that if you are already licensed to practise as an engineer, and later wish to work in a non-regulated occupation, employers may request that you provide them with a formal assessment of your academic credentials.

If that is the case, or if you wish to have your credentials assessed for a purpose other than practising a regulated occupation in Canada, you may consult our Fact Sheet No. 2, “Assessment and recognition of credentials for the purpose of employment in Canada” and contact an academic credential evaluation service. Although evaluation services offer expert advice on how qualifications obtained abroad compare with academic credentials obtained in Canada, their evaluations are advisory only and do not guarantee recognition of your qualifications for employment or certification purposes in Canada. Please note that evaluation services charge a fee for their assessments.

 

Information on assessment for immigration purposes, under the Federal Skilled Worker Program (FSWP)

The Federal Skilled Worker Program (FSWP) is an immigration program administered by Citizenship and Immigration Canada (CIC), the department responsible for immigration to Canada.

CIC has listed the priority occupations (NOC 2131, 2132, 2134, 2143, 2144, 2145, 2146, and 2147) under the FSWP. To apply for immigration to Canada under this program, one of the requirements* is to obtain an “Educational Credential Assessment” (ECA) for immigration purposes from a CIC-designated organization. We invite you to communicate directly with one of the designated organizations to begin this process from outside Canada.

*It is important to note that this requirement is for immigration purposes only. It is separate from the process to obtain a license to practice from the relevant regulatory body listed below. Obtaining a license to practice is not required to apply for immigration.

Other relevant information

The following occupational profiles for specific engineering disciplines may also be of interest:

 

Specific Provincial/Territorial Information

 

 


flechevertehaut.gif List of engineering regulatory bodies

 

Alberta

Association of Professional Engineers and Geoscientists of Alberta (APEGA)
1500 Scotia One, 10060 Jasper Avenue NW
Edmonton AB   T5J 4A2   Canada
Phone : 780-426-3990
Phone (alternate): 1-800-661-7020
Fax : 780-426-1877
Email : email@apegga.org
http://www.apega.ca/ 

British Columbia

Association of Professional Engineers and Geoscientists of British Columbia (APEGBC)
Suite 200, 4010 Regent Street
Burnaby BC   V5C 6N2   Canada
Phone : 604-430-8035
Phone (alternate): 1-888-430-8035
Fax : 604-430-8085
Email : apeginfo@apeg.bc.ca
http://www.apeg.bc.ca/ 

Manitoba

Association of Professional Engineers and Geoscientists of Manitoba (APEGM)
870 Pembina Highway
Winnipeg MB   R3M 2M7   Canada
Phone : 204-474-2736
Phone (alternate): 1 (866) 227-9600
Fax : 204-474-5960
Email : apegm@apegm.mb.ca
http://www.apegm.mb.ca/ 

New Brunswick

Engineers and Geoscientists New Brunswick
183 Hanwell Road
Fredericton NB   E3B 2R2   Canada
Phone : 506-458-8083
Phone (alternate): 1-888-458-8083
Fax : 506-451-9629
Email : info@apegnb.com
http://www.apegnb.com/ 

Newfoundland and Labrador

Professional Engineers and Geoscientists Newfoundland and Labrador (PEGNL)
P.O. Box 21207
10 Fort William Place, Suite 203
St. John’s NL   A1A 5B2   Canada
Phone : 709-753-7714
Fax : 709-753-6131
Email : main@pegnl.ca
http://www.pegnl.ca/ 

Northwest Territories

Northwest Territories and Nunavut Association of Professional Engineers and Geoscientists
201, 4817-49th Street
Yellowknife NT   X1A 3S7   Canada
Phone : 867-920-4055
Fax : 867-873-4058
Email : napeg@napeg.nt.ca
http://www.napeg.nt.ca/ 

Nova Scotia

Engineers Nova Scotia
1355 Barrington Street, P.O. Box 129
Halifax NS   B3J 2M4   Canada
Phone : 902-429-2250
Phone (alternate): 1-888-802-7367
Fax : 902-423-9769
Email : info@engineersnovascotia.ca
http://www.engineersnovascotia.ca 

Nunavut

Northwest Territories and Nunavut Association of Professional Engineers and Geoscientists
201, 4817-49th Street
Yellowknife NT   X1A 3S7    Canada
Phone : 867-920-4055
Fax : 867-873-4058
Email : napeg@napeg.nt.ca
http://www.napeg.nt.ca/ 

Ontario

Professional Engineers Ontario (PEO)
40 Sheppard Avenue West, Suite 101
Toronto ON   M2N 6K9   Canada
Phone : 416-224-1100
Phone (alternate): 1-800-339-3716
Fax : 416-224-8168
Fax (alternate): 1-800-268-0496
Email : MSaldanha@peo.on
http://www.peo.on.ca/ 

Prince Edward Island

Engineers PEI
135 Water Street
Charlottetown PE   C1A 1A8   Canada
Phone : 902-566-1268
Fax : 902-566-5551
Email : info@EngineersPEI.com
http://www.engineerspei.com/ 

Quebec

Ordre des ingénieurs du Québec (OIQ)
Gare Windsor, bureau 350
1100, avenue des Canadiens-de-Montréal
Montréal QC   H3B 2S2   Canada
Phone : 514-845-6141
Phone (alternate): 1-800-461-6141
Fax : 514-845-1833
Email : info@oiq.qc.ca
http://www.oiq.qc.ca/ 

Saskatchewan

Association of Professional Engineers and Geoscientists of Saskatchewan (APEGS)
2255-13th Avenue, Suite 104
Regina SK   S4P 0V6   Canada
Phone : 306-525-9547
Phone (alternate): 1-800-500-9547
Fax : 306-525-0851
Email : apegs@apegs.sk.ca
http://www.apegs.sk.ca/ 

Yukon

Association of Professional Engineers of Yukon (APEY)
312B Hanson Street
Whitehorse YT   Y1A 1Y6   Canada
Phone : 867-667-6727
Fax : 867-668-2142
Email : staff@apey.yk.ca
http://www.apey.yk.ca/ 
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Information for foreign-trained line cooks

Chef Parking

Chef Parking (Photo credits: http://www.myparkingsign.com)

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Information on requirements to practise

This trade has been designated as an Interprovincial Standards Red Seal Trade, which means that all provinces and territories have jointly agreed on certification standards. The Interprovincial Standards “Red Seal” Examinations are administered through the provincial and territorial apprenticeship and training or certification offices. Holders of a Red Seal Certificate are exempt from further examination when moving between participating provinces and territories. A Red Seal Certificate may be required by some employers as a condition for employment. To obtain more information about the Red Seal Certificate, contact:

 

Canadian Council of Directors of Apprenticeship (CCDA)
Red Seal Program / Programme du Sceau rouge
Gatineau QC   K1A 0J9   Canada
Email : redseal-sceaurouge@hrsdc-rhdsc.gc.ca
http://red-seal.ca/c.4nt.1cts@-eng.jsp 

 

For a general description of duties and employment requirements for this occupation, you can refer to the information page on line cooks prepared by the Canadian Tourism Human Resource Council (CTHRC), a not-for-profit, government-funded sector council.

 

Canadian Tourism Human Resource Council (CTHRC)
151 Slater, Suite/Bureau 608
Ottawa ON   K1P 5H3   Canada
Phone : +1-613-231-6949
Email : info@cthrc.ca
http://www.cthrc.ca/ 

 

You may want to take the Discover Tourism Quiz to see if you are suited for this occupation. Employers set the educational requirements as well as the levels of training and experience they expect of applicants.emerit Professional Certification is an asset for line cooks.

The emerit Professional Certification

One of the most widely recognized certificates for this occupation in Canada is the emerit Professional Certification. No formal training is required to achieve this certification, and the knowledge exam, which is the first step in the process, can be taken on-line from anywhere in the world. The emerit certification system is designed to recognize individuals who have mastered the required skills and have met the standards of their profession in a practical job setting. This certificate is based on industry-defined standards and has been developed by the Canadian Tourism Human Resource Council (CTHRC).

For more information about emerit Professional Certification for this occupation, consult theinformation page on the emerit web site, or contact an emerit representative:

 

emerit Tourism Training
     
Phone : +1-613-231-6949
Phone (alternate): 1-800-486-9158
Fax : +1-613-231-6853
Email : info@emerit.ca
http://www.emerit.ca/ 

 

 

Once you know where you will settle and work in Canada, you may want to contact the appropriate local Tourism Human Resource Organization (see list below) for further assistance.

Information on assessment of qualifications

The provincial and territorial apprenticeship and training or certification offices are not set up to assess foreign qualifications prior to your arrival in Canada.

We invite you to consult our Fact Sheet No. 2, “Assessment and recognition of credentials for the purpose of employment in Canada.” We draw to your attention question 8: What is a trade and what is a Red Seal Trade?

 

Other relevant information

For a list of related job titles also used for this occupation, and a general description of duties and employment requirements, you can refer to the information prepared by Human Resources and Skills Development Canada regarding:

You may as well be interested by the information for foreign-trained executive chefs.

For additional information on the tourism industry in Canada, whether you are an employer or you are considering a career in that sector, you may want to explore the following link(s):

Specific Provincial/Territorial Information

 


flechevertehaut.gif List of provincial/territorial Tourism Human Resource Organizations

 

Alberta

Alberta Hotel & Lodging Association (AHLA)
2707 Ellwood Dr SW
Edmonton AB   T6X 0P7   Canada
Phone : 780-436-6112
Phone (alternate): 1-888-436-6112
Fax : 780-436-5404
Email : info@ahla.ca
http://www.ahla.ca 

British Columbia

go2 – The resource for people in Tourism
Suite 450, One Bentall Centre,
505 Burrard Street, P.O. Box 59
Vancouver BC   V7X 1M3   Canada
Phone : 604-633-9787
Phone (alternate): 604-633-9798
Fax : 604-633-9796
Email : info@go2hr.ca
http://www.go2hr.ca 

Manitoba

Manitoba Tourism Education Council (MTEC)
75 Scurfield Boulevard, Unit 3
Winnipeg MB   R3Y 1P6   Canada
Phone : 204-957-7437
Phone (alternate): 1-800-820-6832
Fax : 204-956-1700
Email : info@mtec.mb.ca
http://www.mtec.mb.ca 

New Brunswick

Tourism Industry Association of New Brunswick (TIANB)
500 Beaverbrook Court
4th Floor, Suite 440/4e étage, bureau 440
Fredericton NB   E3B 5X4   Canada
Phone : 506-458-5646
Phone (alternate): 1-800-668-5313
Fax : 506-459-3634
Email : info@tianb.com
http://www.tianb.com/ 

Newfoundland and Labrador

Hospitality Newfoundland and Labrador (HNL)
71 Goldstone Street (Suite 102)
St. John’s NL   A1B 5C3   Canada
Phone : 709-722-2000
Phone (alternate): 1-800-563-0700
Fax : 709-722-8104
Email : hospitality@hnl.ca
http://www.hnl.ca 

Northwest Territories

Yukon Tourism Education Council (YTEC)
Suite C – 202 Strickland Street
Whitehorse YT   Y1A 2J8   Canada
Phone : 867-667-4733
Fax : 867-667-2668
Email : yukontec@internorth.com
http://www.yukontec.com/ 

Nova Scotia

Nova Scotia Tourism Human Resource Council (NSTHRC)
2089 Maitland Street
Halifax NS   B3K 2Z8   Canada
Phone : 902-422-5853
Phone (alternate): 1-800-948-4267
Fax : 902-422-0184
Email : NSTHRC@tourism.ca
http://www.tourismhrc.com/ 

Ontario

Ontario Tourism Education Corporation (OTEC)
Suite 300 – 21 Four Seasons Place
Toronto ON   M9B 6J8   Canada
Phone : 416-622-1975
Phone (alternate): 1-800-557-6832
Fax : 416-622-7476
Email : info@otec.org
http://www.otec.org/ 

Prince Edward Island

Tourism Industry Association of Prince Edward Island (TIAPEI)
3rd Floor, 25 Queen Street, P.O. Box 2050
Charlottetown PE   C1A 7N7   Canada
Phone : 902-566-5008
Phone (alternate): 1-866-566-5008
Fax : 902-368-3605
Fax (alternate): 1-877-368-3605
Email : tiapei@tiapei.pe.ca
http://www.tiapei.pe.ca/ 

Quebec

Conseil québécois des ressources humaines en tourisme (CQRHT)
2751, boulevard Jacques-Cartier Est, Bureau 200
Longueuil QC   J4N 1L7   Canada
Phone : 450-651-1099
Fax : 450-651-1567
Email : info@cqrht.qc.ca
http://www.cqrht.qc.ca/ 

Saskatchewan

Saskatchewan Tourism Education Council (STEC)
202 Fourth Avenue North, Suite 102
Saskatoon SK   S7K 0k1   Canada
Phone : 306-933-5900
Phone (alternate): 1-800-331-1529
Fax : 306-933-6250
Email : stec@sasktourism.com
http://www.stec.com 

Yukon

Yukon Tourism Education Council (YTEC)
Suite C – 202 Strickland Street
Whitehorse YT   Y1A 2J8   Canada
Phone : 867-667-4733
Fax : 867-667-2668
Email : yukontec@internorth.com
http://www.yukontec.com/ 
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Information for Applicants to the New Federal Skilled Worker Program

The Federal Skilled Worker Program (FSWP) selects immigrants based on their ability to succeed economically in Canada. After meeting eligibility requirements, applicants are assessed against selection criteria, also known as the “points grid.” There are 100 points available to applicants, with points awarded for official language abilities, age, education, work experience, employment already arranged in Canada, and adaptability. The current pass mark is 67.
After a thorough review of relevant research, an extensive program evaluation, stakeholder and public consultations, research and study of best practices in other immigrant-receiving countries, improvements to the FSWP were announced in December 2012. These improvements will come into force on May 4, 2013.
A pause on the intake of most new FSWP applications has been in place since July 1, 2012, except for those with a qualifying job offer and those who applying under the PhD stream. The pause will be lifted and an eligible occupations stream re-established on May 4, 2013.
While Citizenship and Immigration Canada (CIC) will not be accepting applications for the 24 eligible occupations until May 4, 2013, there are some new requirements that applicants can start preparing for, such as language tests and foreign educational credential assessments. The complete application process, featuring the new selection criteria, will be available on CIC’s website by May 4, 2013.
All individuals who are considering applying on or after May 4 should be aware that if their application does not meet the new criteria, it will not be processed. A prospective applicant should ensure they meet at least one of the following requirements:
  • They have at least one year of continuous work experience in one of the 24 eligible occupations;
  • They have a qualifying offer of arranged employment (*note changes to the arranged employment process were previously published in this web notice); or
  • They are eligible to apply through the PhD stream.
If prospective applicants are confident that they meet at least one of the above requirements, they must also meet the minimum language threshold and obtain an educational credential assessment (if submitting a foreign educational credential).

Eligible Occupations List

The eligible occupations stream will have an overall cap of 5,000 new applications and sub-caps of 300 applications in each of the 24 occupations on the list.

Eligible occupations (with their corresponding 2011 National Occupation Classification code):

  • 0211 Engineering managers
  • 1112 Financial and investment analysts
  • 2113 Geoscientists and oceanographers
  • 2131 Civil engineers
  • 2132 Mechanical engineers
  • 2134 Chemical engineers
  • 2143 Mining engineers
  • 2144 Geological engineers
  • 2145 Petroleum engineers
  • 2146 Aerospace engineers
  • 2147 Computer engineers (except software engineers/designers)
  • 2154 Land surveyors
  • 2174 Computer programmers and interactive media developers
  • 2243 Industrial instrument technicians and mechanics
  • 2263 Inspectors in public and environmental health and occupational health and safety
  • 3141 Audiologists and speech-language pathologists
  • 3142 Physiotherapists
  • 3143 Occupational Therapists
  • 3211 Medical laboratory technologists
  • 3212 Medical laboratory technicians and pathologists’ assistants
  • 3214 Respiratory therapists, clinical perfusionists and cardiopulmonary technologists
  • 3215 Medical radiation technologists
  • 3216 Medical sonographers
  • 3217 Cardiology technicians and electrophysiological diagnostic technologists, n.e.c. (not elsewhere classified)

Minimum Language Threshold

All prospective applicants to the FSWP should first determine whether they meet the new minimum language threshold: Canadian Language Benchmark (CLB) 7 or Niveaux de compétence linguistique canadiens (NCLC) 7 in all four skills (listening, speaking, reading, and writing). To prove language proficiency, a prospective applicant must take a third-party language test from an organization designated by the Minister and submit their test report along with their application to CIC.
Language test results will be accepted by CIC for two years from the date that they were issued by the designated organization.
CIC-designated language testing organizations include: Canadian English Language Proficiency Index Program (CELPIP),International English Language Testing System (IELTS), and Test d’évaluation de français (TEF).
Third-party language tests are scored differently by each of the three organizations. Here are the scores on each of the tests that correspond to Canadian Language Benchmark (CLB) 7 or Niveaux de compétence linguistique canadiens (NCLC) 7 or higher:

English

An FSWP applicant must score at least 4L on the CELPIP-General test in each of the four skills to meet the minimum language threshold.
A score of 4L on the CELPIP-General test corresponds to CLB 7. A score of 4H corresponds to CLB 8, and a score of 5 or higher corresponds to CLB 9 or higher.
An FSWP applicant must score at least 6.0 on the IELTS General Training test in each of the four skills to meet the minimum language threshold of CLB 7.

French

An FSWP applicant must score at least 206 in reading, 248 in listening, and 309 in both speaking and writing on the TEF to meet the minimum language threshold of NCLC 7.

Arranged Employment

Previously, employers have applied for an Arranged Employment Opinion (AEO) from Human Resources Skills Development Canada when they wished to hire a foreign national on a permanent, full-time basis and support their employee’s application for permanent residence through the FSWP.
Starting on May 4, 2013, CIC will no longer accept AEOs in support of an FSWP application. Instead, most offers of arranged employment will require a Labour Market Opinion.

Educational Credential Assessment (ECA)

Another important change that takes effect on May 4, 2013, is the introduction of the educational credential assessment (ECA). Prospective applicants may start the process of getting an ECA before May 4 if they are planning to submit a foreign educational credential. However, applicants should keep in mind the other program eligibility requirements listed above, i.e. whether they have a qualifying offer of arranged employment or are applying under the PhD stream or eligible occupations stream; and if they meet the minimum language threshold through a designated third-party test. Applicants who have Canadian educational credentials do not need to get an ECA, unless they are also submitting a foreign educational credential in support of their application.
The ECA process will help determine if the foreign educational credential is authentic and equivalent to a completed credential in Canada. For prospective applicants, the ECA can provide a realistic understanding of how their foreign educational credentials are likely to be recognized in Canada.
As of April 17, 2013, four organizations have been designated by the Minister to provide ECA reports for purposes of immigrating to Canada under the FSWP. Additional organizations may be designated by CIC in the future. The designated organizations are:
The Medical Council of Canada has been designated only for those principal applicants who intend to apply with specialist physician (2011 National Occupation Classification [NOC] code 3111) or general practitioner/family physician (2011 NOC code 3112) as their primary occupation in their FSWP application. Neither NOC code 3111 nor 3112 is on the eligible occupations list that takes effect on May 4, so this will only affect those applying under the PhD stream or with a qualifying job offer based on those NOC codes.
Applicants should contact the designated organizations directly for further information on their documentation requirements, processing times and fees.
CIC will only accept ECA reports issued after the date the organization was designated by CIC to provide ECA reports for immigration purposes (i.e. April 17, 2013). An ECA report will be valid for immigration purposes for 5 years from the date that it was issued by the designated organization.
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The new Skilled Trades Program

““The new Skilled Trades Program will address serious labour shortages that some regions of the country are facing, and will help grow Canada’s economy,” said Minister Kenney. “These long-overdue changes are part of the government’s plan to build a fast and flexible immigration system that is responsive to the needs of Canada’s economy. Canadian employers have long been asking for ways to get the skilled tradespeople they need to meet demands in many industries across the country. We’ve listened to their concerns and created this program in response.”

In the program’s first year, CIC will accept applications from up to 3,000 people in specific trades. The occupation list was designed to reflect current labour market needs and ensure the program delivers a diverse range of skilled tradespeople to fuel Canada’s economy. Within the 3,000, there will be no limit on 26 in-demand occupations, while 17 occupations will be subject to sub-limits of 100 applications each. In total, there are 43 occupations eligible for the Federal Skilled Trades Program. Applications are expected to be processed within 12 months.
In addition to being qualified for an eligible occupation, Federal Skilled Trades Program applicants must demonstrate basic language proficiency in either English or French at the Canadian Language Benchmark (CLB) level 5 for speaking and listening, and CLB 4 for reading and writing. This is due to the overall importance of language as a determinant of immigrant success and general health and safety reasons. CLB 4 is considered basic proficiency while those with CLB 5 can more effectively participate in and understand routine conversations.
Other criteria include: a valid offer of employment in Canada or a certificate of qualification from a province or territory in a qualifying skilled trade; at least two years of work experience in the occupation within the last five years; and meeting the employment requirements set out in the National Occupational Classification system, with the exception of licensing requirements, which are addressed separately.
“The Federal Skilled Trades Program is yet another tool in the Canadian employer’s toolkit to find the workers they need to build Canada’s future economy,” said Minister Kenney. “This new program, along with all other changes we are introducing, will help us move towards an immigration system that better supports Canada’s economic growth and long-term prosperity.”
Application forms for the Federal Skilled Trades Program can be found on the CIC website.
To avoid backlogs and ensure fast processing times, we will accept no more than 3,000 complete federal skilled trade applications to process in the first year (from January 2, 2013 to January 1, 2014).
Within the 3,000 cap, no more than 100 new applications for each job under Group A below will be considered for processing. There is no sub-cap for jobs under Group B.
Group A includes 17 jobs with a moderate labour market need. Group B includes 26 in-demand jobs. In total, 43 jobs will be eligible to apply under the Federal Skilled Trades program in the first year of the program. The specific codes from the 2011 version of the NOC are provided below as you must include this in your application form.
The caps apply whether or not people have a qualifying offer of employment or a certificate of qualification from a provincial or territorial apprenticeship authority.
Applications will be processed in the order we receive them.
Group A – Jobs with sub-caps of 100 applications each (and their corresponding 2011 NOC code)
  • 7202 Contractors and supervisors, electrical trades and telecommunications occupations
  • 7204 Contractors and supervisors, carpentry trades
  • 7205 Contractors and supervisors, other construction trades, installers, repairers and servicers
  • 7271 Carpenters
  • 7301 Contractors and supervisors, mechanic trades
  • 7302 Contractors and supervisors, heavy equipment operator crews
  • 8211 Supervisors, logging and forestry
  • 8221 Supervisors, mining and quarrying
  • 8222 Contractors and supervisors, oil and gas drilling services
  • 8241 Logging machinery operators
  • 8252 Agricultural service contractors, farm supervisors and specialized livestock workers
  • 9211 Supervisors, mineral and metal processing
  • 9212 Supervisors, petroleum, gas and chemical processing and utilities
  • 9214 Supervisors, plastic and rubber products manufacturing
  • 9231 Central control and process operators, mineral and metal processing
  • 9241 Power engineers and power systems operators
  • 9243 Water and waste treatment plant operators
Group B – no sub-caps (2011 NOC code)
  • 7231 Machinists and machining and tooling inspectors
  • 7233 Sheet metal workers
  • 7235 Structural metal and plate work fabricators and fitters
  • 7236 Ironworkers
  • 7237 Welders and related machine operators
  • 7241 Electricians (except industrial and power system)
  • 7242 Industrial electricians
  • 7243 Power system electricians
  • 7244 Electrical power line and cable workers
  • 7245 Telecommunications line and cable workers
  • 7246 Telecommunications installation and repair workers
  • 7251 Plumbers
  • 7252 Steamfitters, pipefitters and sprinkler system installers
  • 7253 Gas fitters
  • 7311 Construction millwrights and industrial mechanics
  • 7312 Heavy-duty equipment mechanics
  • 7313 Refrigeration and air conditioning mechanics
  • 7314 Railway carmen/women
  • 7315 Aircraft mechanics and aircraft inspectors
  • 7318 Elevator constructors and mechanics
  • 7371 Crane operators
  • 7372 Drillers and blasters – surface, mining, quarrying and construction
  • 7373 Water well drillers
  • 8231 Underground production and development miners
  • 8232 Oil and gas well drillers, servicers, testers and related workers
  • 9232 Petroleum, gas and chemical process operators
You must complete your applications according to the requirements in place at the time you apply.
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New Parent and Grandparent program re-opens January 2, 2014

Matti

Matti (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Matti (Photo credit: Wikipedia)
Mississauga, May 10, 2013 — Citizenship and Immigration Canada will re-open the Parent and Grandparent (PGP) program for new applications on January 2, 2014, by which time the backlog and wait times in the program are expected to have been cut in half.
“The Action Plan for Faster Family Reunification is on track to meet the goals of cutting in half the backlog and wait times in the Parent and Grandparent program,” said Citizenship, Immigration and Multiculturalism Minister Jason Kenney. “It is very important that we continue to make progress and not return to the old broken system with wait times as long as a decade—that would be unfair to families.”
Phase II of the Action Plan for Faster Family Reunification will provide even faster processing times, reduce the backlog further, prevent future backlogs, ensure that families have the financial means to support those they sponsor, and protect the interests of taxpayers.
First – In 2012 and 2013, Canada will admit 50,000 parents and grandparents as permanent residents. This represents the highest level of parents and grandparents admitted in 20 years. In 2014, Canada will maintain high levels of admissions for parents and grandparents.
Second – The Super Visa will become permanent and will continue to provide flexibility for families who access the 10-year multiple-entry visa, allowing visa holders to remain in Canada up to two years at a time. Over 15,000 Super Visas have been issued since the program’s launch in December 2011 with approval rates averaging 86 percent.
Third – New qualifying criteria for permanent residency sponsorship of parents and grandparents will increase the financial responsibility of sponsors to ensure they have the means to support those they sponsor, while limiting the program’s cost to taxpayers and Canada’s strained health and social programs.
Fourth – 5,000 new sponsorship applications will be accepted in the program in 2014. By accepting 5,000 applications in 2014 while maintaining high levels, the government will be able to further reduce the remaining backlog so that families can be reunited more quickly.
“These new criteria ensure sponsored family members are well supported by their sponsors throughout their time in Canada,” said Minister Kenney. “The redesigned Parent and Grandparent program reunites families faster while respecting Canadian taxpayers and the limited resources for health and social programs.”
Canada has one of the most generous family reunification programs in the world. The United States, United Kingdom, Australia and New Zealand do not allow grandparents to be sponsored at all or only in very limited circumstances, and they have very restrictive criteria for the sponsorship of parents.
The amendments to the Immigration and Refugee Protection Regulations that are being proposed will be pre-published in theCanada Gazette (Part I) and the public will be able to comment for a 30-day period.
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Action Plan for Faster Family Reunification: Phase II

English: A grandfather teaching his little gra...
English: A grandfather teaching his little granddaughter how to ride a kick scooter. Simmering, Vienna, Austria, June 2006. Photo by KF. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)
With the backlog and wait times being cut in half, Phase II of that Action Plan for Faster Family Reunification will build on that success with further backlog reduction and even faster processing times.

First: Maintain high admissions

In 2012 and 2013, Canada will admit 50,000 parents and grandparents. This represents the highest level in 20 years. In 2014, Canada will maintain high levels of admissions for parents and grandparents.
This will help reunite more families and enable further backlog reduction.

Second: Make the Super Visa a permanent program

The Super Visa will become a permanent program and will continue to provide flexibility for families who can access the 10-year multiple-entry visa that allows parents and grandparents to remain in Canada up to two years at a time. The Super Visa is very popular. Over 1,000 Super Visas are issued each month, with over 15,000 Super Visas issued since its launch in December 2011 and approval rates remain high at 86 percent.

Third: New qualifying criteria for permanent residency sponsorship

New qualifying criteria ensure that sponsors have the financial means to support parents and grandparents, while reducing the net costs to Canadian taxpayers by leading to less reliance on health care and social programs.
The new qualifying criteria include:
  • Increase minimum necessary income (MNI) for sponsoring parents and grandparents equivalent by 30 percent: The current MNI does not accurately reflect the increased costs associated with being financially responsible for elderly parents and grandparents. The modest increase in the MNI will ensure sponsors are able to meet the financial needs of their sponsored parents and grandparents, which will reduce the net costs to Canadian taxpayers.
  • Lengthen period for demonstrating the MNI from one year to three years:  Individuals who seek to sponsor their parents and grandparents and their accompanying family members will be required to demonstrate that they meet the new income threshold for the three consecutive tax years prior to submitting the sponsorship application. Requiring prospective sponsors of parents and grandparents to provide evidence of income over a three-year period, as opposed to 12 months, will help ensure sponsors have income stability and the financial means to provide for the basic needs of their parents and grandparents. It will also guarantee that prospective sponsors are contributing to the public services their sponsored family members are likely to use (for example, provincial health care, public transportation, etc.).
  • Evidence of income confined to documents issued by the Canada Revenue Agency (CRA): Individuals who seek to sponsor their parents and grandparents and their accompanying family members will be required to demonstrate that they meet the new income threshold for three consecutive years using CRA notices of assessment. This will mean that officials could spend less time reviewing and verifying documents and could help speed up processing times even further. It will also guarantee that prospective sponsors are contributing to the public services their sponsored family members are likely to use (for example, provincial health care, public transportation, etc.).
  • Extend the sponsorship undertaking period to 20 years instead of 10 years:  The current sponsorship undertaking period for parents and grandparents is 10 years.  Individuals who seek to sponsor their parents and grandparents and accompanying family members will be required to commit to a lengthened sponsorship undertaking period of 20 years. This means sponsors and co-signers (if applicable) will be responsible for repaying any provincial social assistance benefits paid to the parent and grandparent and their accompanying family members for 20 years. A lengthened sponsorship undertaking will protect Canadian taxpayers and ensure sponsors assume more financial responsibility for the basic needs of their parents and grandparents over a longer period of time, as well as for health care costs not covered by provincial health care (for example, eye care, dental care, mobility aids, etc.).
  • Changing the maximum age of dependents: The maximum age of dependents will be set at 18 years of age and under for all immigration programs, including the Parent and Grandparent program. This is in line with the standard age of majority in Canada. Those over the age of 18 can apply to visit or immigrate to Canada independently. There will be an exception for individuals, regardless of age, who are financially dependent on their parents due to a mental or physical disability.

Fourth: Accepting 5,000 applications in 2014

By accepting 5,000 applications in 2014 while maintaining high levels of admissions of parents and grandparents, the government will be able to further reduce the remaining backlog so that families can be reunited even more quickly. Opening the program to an unlimited number of applications as was done in the past will grow the backlog again and increase wait times, undoing the progress made to date.
For additional information on the proposal to redesign of the PGP program, please consult the draft regulatory package.

Medical Laboratory Technologist in Canada.

English: MLS in his work environment.

English: MLS in his work environment. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

English: MLS in his work environment. (Photo credit:Wikipedia)
The profession of medical laboratory technologist is a regulated one in the provinces of Alberta, Manitoba, New Brunswick, Newfoundland and Labrador, Nova Scotia, Ontario, Quebec and Saskatchewan. The profession is not regulated in the provinces of British Columbia, Prince Edward Island, Newfoundland and Labrador, and the Territories.
Appropriate provincial and territorial regulatory bodies set the rules and regulations for entry into the profession and issue licenses to those who meet the qualifications.By law, you are not allowed to work as a medical laboratory technologist in any province where it is regulated, if you haven’t been issued a license by the regulatory body there.
The Canadian Society for Medical Laboratory Science(CSMLS) is the national certifying body and professional association for medical laboratory technologists and medical laboratory assistants. The CSMLS conduct examinations for general medical laboratory technology, diagnostic cytology, clinical genetics and medical laboratory assistants. It works in partnership with provincial regulatory bodies, does advocacy work and certifies people in the profession. Its certification is accepted across Canada and required by the provinces and territories that do not have yet an individual regulatory body.
To improve your chances of success to practice your profession in your future country, there are many steps that you can take before immigrating to Canada:
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Coming to Canada as a Nurse – The Process

Permanent Resident Card (2002-2007)

Permanent Resident Card (2002-2007) (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Permanent Resident Card (2002-2007) (Photo credit: Wikipedia)
In our last edition, CIC News explained how Canada has opened its doors to welcome internationally educated nurses. This article will focus on the different ways a nurse can come to Canada to work and live. As the demand for nurses continues to grow, nurses are presented with the opportunity to seek either permanent or temporary residency in Canada.
A registered nurse or licensed practical nurse seeking permanent residency in Canada is invited to discover the benefits of the Quebec Skilled Worker (QSW) immigration program. Nurses with international credentials may also seek temporary residency in Canada if they obtain a valid job offer and subsequent work permit. Once working in Canada on a temporary basis, permanent residency options may later present themselves through alternate immigration programs.
Permanent Residency: The Quebec Option:
The Province of Quebec has implemented an immigration policy that reflects its high demand for nurses. With high salaries, available jobs and a rapidly expanding healthcare system, Quebec seeks to bring the best international nursing professionals to its cities and towns. The QSW program, the province’s most popular program for permanent residency, has been set up in a way that benefits qualified nurses.
The QSW program offers internationally educated nurses an opportunity to seek permanent residency in Canada without the need to secure a job offer. The QSW program is a points-based selection system and points are awarded for various factors which include age, education, area of training, work experience, language ability etc. If an applicant scores enough points to reach the pass-mark, he or she will generally qualify for a Quebec Selection Certificate, which ultimately leads to a Canadian permanent resident visa, in the absence of health and/or security issues.
The QSW selection criteria awards a significant number of points for French language ability. However, under this program many nurses are able to score enough points to reach the pass mark without obtaining any points for French language ability. This is because nurses are able to earn very high points for the “area of training” selection factor as well as high points for their education.
To find out more about the QSW program and its selection factors, please click here.
Temporary Residency: The Work Permit Option:
As the Canadian Nurses Association (CNA) is predicting a continued shortage of nurses in the future, nursing jobs in the country are more plentiful than ever. Internationally educated nurses may apply to work temporarily in Canada. Temporary residency for foreign trained nurses may be achieved if the applicant secures a valid job offer and subsequently, a work permit.
To begin this process, an applicant with a nursing degree from outside Canada must have their educational credentials assessed. Since educational credentials can be assessed from both inside and outside Canada, applicants are given the option to remain in their country of residence during the assessment process.
After educational credentials have been assessed, applicants must register as a nurse in Canada. When this has been completed, an applicant may initiate the process of obtaining a job offer and work permit in Canada. To facilitate the process of finding a job offer, some individual provinces have implemented services helping connect internationally educated nurses to employment opportunities in healthcare communities.
Once working in Canada on temporary basis, an applicant looking for permanent residency may then explore their immigration options through programs such as the Canadian Experience Class or Provincial Nominee programs.
How to register as a nurse in Canada:
Any nurse planning to work in Canada must be deemed as qualified to practice as a Registered Nurse (RN) or Licensed/Registered Practical Nurse (LPN/RPN). To qualify, an applicant must register with either the Canadian Nurses Association (CAN) or the Canadian Council for Practical Nurse Regulators (CCPNR).
In Canada registration requirements are established by individual provinces and territories. To register with the CNA or CCPNR, nurses must first apply to the nursing regulatory body of the province or territory where they wish to work:
In general, in order to be eligible to register as an RN or LPN, an applicant will need to demonstrate competency to practice. To demonstrate this, an applicant will need to have their education credentials assessed. Once education credentials are deemed equivalent to nursing education programs in Canada, the nursing regulatory body will then address whether other application requirements are met. Additional application requirements generally include criteria such as work experience, good character, language proficiency, screening for criminal history and registration in the jurisdiction where the applicant currently practices.
Once a positive assessment of the application requirements has been met, Canadian provinces and territories, with the exception of Quebec, require that nurses write the Canadian Registered Nurse Examination (CRNE) or Canadian Practical Nurse Registration Exam (CPNRE) as part of the registration or licensure process (the province of Quebec maintains its own registration examination). At present, these exams can only be written in Canada. Once an applicant has successfully completed the required examination, the applicant may be eligible to work as a nurse in Canada.
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